Amazon • 2012 • episode "Part 3" • Nature's Microworlds

Category: Nature
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Steve Backshall lifts the lid on an incredible world of intricate relationships and unexpected hardship in the Amazon rainforest, explores the way that the jungle's inhabitants interact, and reveals a hidden secret that might just be what keeps the whole place alive.

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