Black Holes • 2014 • episode "1/6" Strip the Cosmos

Category: Astronomy
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We strip apart black holes, one of the most feared objects in the universe, and tear off swirling galaxies of stars, planets, and cosmic dust layer by layer to explore the secrets of these hungry menaces lurking right on our cosmic doorstep.

Strip the Cosmos • 0 • 6 episodes •

Black Holes

We strip apart black holes, one of the most feared objects in the universe, and tear off swirling galaxies of stars, planets, and cosmic dust layer by layer to explore the secrets of these hungry menaces lurking right on our cosmic doorstep.

2014 • Astronomy

The Sun

We strip apart the Sun and tear off boiling seas of plasma, light particles, and force fields layer by layer to explore the secrets that lie beneath the surface of Earth’s powerhouse.

2014 • Astronomy

Killer Asteroids

We strip apart asteroids and peel back surfaces, slice open craters, and exploding out rocks layer by layer to explore these miniature worlds and the secrets of the early solar system.

2014 • Astronomy

Mars

Using CGI to strip Mars layer by layer and tear off swirling dust storms, frozen ice caps, and study the secrets that lie beneath the Red Planet.

2014 • Astronomy

Alien Worlds

We strip apart bizarre planets and strange moons and peel away impenetrable atmospheres, icy crusts and alien oceans layer by layer to reveal the secrets to extraterrestrial life.

2014 • Astronomy

Comets

We strip apart comets, peeling away their dusty layers and their iconic tails to reveal the secrets of these mysterious visitors from deep space.

2014 • Astronomy

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