SCIENCE • 61 videos

Frontiers of Science

As the director of one of a world renowned institute for scientific research -- the Institute for Advanced Study -- Robbert Dijkgraaf is a pioneer in the field of mathematical physics. This string theory specialist draws from his experiences to elucidate current advances in physics.

2014 • Curiosity Retreats: 2014 Lectures • Science

Is gun Crime a Virus?

Every 17 minutes in America, someone is killed with a gun. Politicians can't seem to stop the violence. But epidemiologists, psychologists and big data crunchers are discovering that gun crime spreads like a virus -and science may be able to stop its spread.

2017 • Through the Wormhole • Science

Can We Hack the Planet?

Humanity is under threat - from storms that seem to get ever fiercer, earthquakes that seem ever more deadly, and killer viruses that are engulfing the globe. Some scientists think it's time for us to fight back. Can we - should we -hack the planet?

2017 • Through the Wormhole • Science

Can We Cheat Death?

Death is life's greatest certainty. But that may be about to change. Scientists have discovered an immortal animal that may hold the secret of endless regeneration. They're on the brink of editing our DNA so that we can cure death like a disease. Or is dying necessary for the survival of our species?

2017 • Through the Wormhole • Science

Is The Force With us?

New research is beginning to reveal a hidden force in the universe - one that penetrates space with trillions of invisible connections, instantly linking every place in our world and joining our future with our past. Is the Force with us?

2017 • Through the Wormhole • Science

Top Science Stories of 2016

From the detection of gravitational waves generated in space over a billion years ago, to discoveries in genetics here on Earth, we've collected the most compelling science breakthroughs and advances of 2016. Thanks to magnificent, hard-working scientists and researchers around the world, science keeps marching ever forward. And this year saw some discoveries that are absolutely brimming with the promise of greater discoveries, breakthroughs and quality of life in the future.

2016 • Science

Pop: The Science of Bubbles

Physicist Dr Helen Czerski takes us on an amazing journey into the science of bubbles. Bubbles may seem to be just fun toys, but they are also powerful tools that push back the boundaries of science. The soap bubble with its delicate, fragile skin tells us about how nature works on scales as large as solar system and as small as a single wavelength of light. Then there are underwater bubbles, which matter because they are part of the how the planet works. Out at sea, breaking waves generate huge plumes of bubbles which help the oceans breathe. From the way animals behave to the way drinks taste, Dr Czerski shows how bubbles affect our world in all sorts of unexpected ways. Whether it's the future of ship design or innovative new forms of medical treatment, bubbles play a vital role.

2013 • Science

How Science Changed Our World

Professor Robert Winston presents his top ten scientific breakthroughs of the past 50 years. Tracing these momentous and wide-ranging discoveries, he meets a real-life bionic woman, one of the first couples to test the male contraceptive pill, and even some of his early IVF patients. He explores the origins of the universe, probes the inner workings of the human mind and sees the most powerful laser in the world. To finish, Professor Winston reveals the breakthrough he thinks is most significant.

2010 • Science

Fully Charged

Saiful explores one of the most important issues facing the modern world - how to store energy. He tackles his toughest challenge yet - trying to work out how to store enough energy to power a mobile phone for a whole year and still fit it in his pocket!

2016 • Supercharged: Fuelling the Future • Science

People Power

Saiful investigates how humans as living pulsing machines actually use energy, asking whether it's possible to 'supercharge' the human body and increase its performance. Live experiments explore everything from the explosive potential of everyday foods, to what we put into our bodies (and what comes out!), as well as how we measure up to the machines we use every day. Saiful even experiments on himself, showing images captured inside his own stomach. Every single one of us is an incredibly sophisticated energy conversion machine, finely tuned over millions of years of evolution. So will we ever be able to improve the human body's performance? Can we ever do more with less energy?

2016 • Supercharged: Fuelling the Future • Science

Let There be Light

Saiful investigates how to generate energy without destroying the planet in the process. Saiful begins his lecture by being plunged into darkness. Armed initially with nothing but a single candle, his challenge is to go back to first principles and bring back the power in the energy-hungry lecture theatre. Along the way he explains what energy is, how we can transform it from one form to another, and how we harness it to power the modern world. A fascinating and stimulating celebration of the stuff that quite literally makes the universe tick - the weird and wonderful world of energy.

2016 • Supercharged: Fuelling the Future • Science

The Science of Laughter

Comedian Jimmy Carr takes over Horizon for this one-off special programme, produced as part of BBC2's sitcom season. Jimmy turns venerable documentary strand Horizon into a chat show, with eminent laughter scientists as guests and a studio audience to use as guinea pigs. Jimmy and his guests try to get to the bottom of what laughter is, why we enjoy it so much and what, if anything, it has to do with comedy. Between them, and with the help of contributions from other scientists on film, Jimmy and guests discover that laughter is much older than our species, and may well have contributed to making us human. With professors Sophie Scott, Robin Dunbar and Peter McGraw.

2016 • Horizon • Science

Where are We?

In this episode, the volunteers attempt to discover where we really are in the universe.

2016 • Genius by Stephen Hawking • Science

What are We?

In this episode the volunteers are led to a realization about the nature of life itself.

2016 • Genius by Stephen Hawking • Science

Where Did the Universe Come from?

In this mind-bending episode can the participants work out where the universe comes from?

2016 • Genius by Stephen Hawking • Science

Why Are We Here?

Can the participants work out why they exist at all? Is it destiny or pure chance?

2016 • Genius by Stephen Hawking • Science

Are We Alone?

In this episode the task is to work out the likelihood of alien life in the universe.

2016 • Genius by Stephen Hawking • Science

Can We Time Travel?

Three individuals face a series of challenges to find out if it's possible to time travel.

2016 • Genius by Stephen Hawking • Science

Ice Station Antarctica

Antarctica is the last great wilderness. It's the coldest, windiest, driest and most isolated place on Earth. And every winter, for over three months of the year, the sun never rises. But it's also home to the British Antarctic Survey's Halley Research Station. A veteran of living and working at Halley in the early eighties, BBC weatherman Peter Gibbs makes an emotional return to the place he once called home. A place that, during his time, was key to the discovery of the ozone hole. The journey starts with an arduous 12-day, 3000-mile voyage onboard the RRS Ernest Shackleton. Once on the ice shelf, Peter is delighted to finally arrive at the futuristic research station and marvels at the cutting edge science being done at Halley today. From vital discoveries about how our lives are vulnerable to the sun's activities, to studying interplanetary travel and the threat of man-made climate change. But Peter's journey is also something of a rescue mission. The research station's home is a floating ice shelf that constantly moves and cracks, and the ice shelf has developed a chasm that could cast Halley adrift on a massive iceberg.

2016 • Horizon • Science

Birth of Life (Planet Science)

What are the origins of life? How did things go from non-living to living? From something that could not reproduce to something that could? Earth is estimated to be about 4.5 billion years old, and for much of that history it has been home to life in one form or another. Our planet is teaming with life, from the highest mountain to the deepest ocean; life is everywhere. But what was the firing pistol that started the evolutionary race? How did material go from non-living to alive? It's one of the most fundamental and difficult questions that has challenged us since the beginning of time.

2007 • Science

100,000,000 Years From Now

100,000,000 years from now, a team of alien geologists arrive at a mysterious blue-green planet, and decide to investigate. Here's what they'll find…

2016 • Science

How does do science?

How do we learn properly so we can be right all the time? How can we know that we know, when we don't know what we don't know?

2015 • This Place • Science

Where Did We Come From?

In this episode of NOVA scienceNOW, journey back in time to the birth of our solar system to examine whether the key to our planet's existence might have been the explosive shockwave of an ancient supernova. Meet a chemist who has yielded a new kind of "recipe" for natural processes to assemble and create the building blocks of life. And see how the head louse, a creepy critter that's been sucking our blood for millions of years, is offering clues about our evolution. Finally, meet neuroscientist André Fenton, who is looking into erasing painful memories with an injection.

2011 • NOVA PBS • Science

50 Lies That You Still Believe

From Viking helmets to goldfish only having 3 seconds of memory, to goldfish only having 3 seconds of memory, we count 50 common misconceptions you have about the world :)

2015 • Science

The Coriolis Effect

Why do storms spin in different directions depending on their location—and why do they spin in the first place?

2013 • Science

Why Tomatoes Are Fruits, and Strawberries Aren't Berries

Did you know that bananas are berries, but strawberries aren’t? A lot of thought goes into classifying fruits and vegetables, and it all has to do with anatomy.

SciShow • Science

Science can answer moral questions

Questions of good and evil, right and wrong are commonly thought unanswerable by science. But Sam Harris argues that science can -- and should -- be an authority on moral issues, shaping human values and setting out what constitutes a good life.

TED-Ed • Science

Masters of Time

The last episode in the series examines how humans perceive and experience time, investigating the internal body clock which tells people when to eat, drink, sleep and relax. The importance of accurately measuring time is explored in relation to human evolution, and there's a debate about whether mankind will ever be able to travel between past, present and future.

Time Machine • Science

Life: The Race Against Time

How the passing of time on Earth affects life on a variety of levels, from the daily opening of a flower's petals to the evolution of the horse. A swift journey through the seasons demonstrates how caribou spend most of their time on the move, while the flying squirrel's body clock, attuned to the rhythms of the Earth, is revealed to be the most accurate in nature.

Time Machine • Science

The World Shaped By Time

First in a three-part documentary series offering an insight into the dramatic forces that shape life on Earth, using speeded-up footage that compresses centuries into seconds. The programme follows the movement of mountains, rivers, glaciers and the sea, and offers a glimpse of what the future might hold, revealing how the Great Rift Valley may well be on its way to becoming the next ocean.

Time Machine • Science

The Science Behind 'Genetically Modified Humans'

The media have been talking about “genetically modified humans” and “designer babies.” But what they’re really talking about is germ-line engineering: a process that could help eliminate heritable diseases. So why do some scientists want to pause the research?

SciShow • Science

How Many Heartbeats Do We Get?

Ever wonder how the heart symbol came to stand for the actual heart? And why do we speak of the heart as the seat of love, when love really happens in our brains? Is it true that animals only get a billion heartbeats? This week, we give you enough cool cardiac science to make your heart skip a beat.

It's Okay To Be Smart • Science

Questions no one knows the answers to

Chris Anderson shares his boyhood obsession with quirky questions that seem to have no answers.

Science

The Science of Interstellar

Matthew McConaughey takes viewers behind the scenes of Interstellar with a look at the real-life science that went into this out-of-this-world film.

Science

Star Trek: Secrets of the Universe

Is building our own starship Enterprise possible? Will we ever travel between the stars as easily as they do in Star Trek? JJ Abrams' new feature, Star Trek Into Darkness, hits the screen in a golden age of scientific discoveries. HISTORY is there, giving viewers a deep look behind the scenes, on the set, and into the science–amazing new exoplanets, the physics of Warp drive, and the ideas behind how we might one day live in a Star Trek Universe.

Science

How do you know you exist?

How do you know you’re real? Is existence all just a big dream? Has some mad scientist duped us into simply believing that we exist? James Zucker investigates all of these questions (and more) in this mind-boggling tribute to René Descartes’s "Meditations on First Philosophy."

TED-Ed • Science

What Is The Secret of Life?

The story of how the secret of life has been examined through the prism of the human body.

2010 • The Story of Science • Science

How Did We Get Here?

Michael Mosley tells how scientists came to explain the diversity of life on earth.

2010 • The Story of Science • Science

Why Are We Here?

Brian Cox tackles the question that unites Earth's seven billion people - why are we here?

2014 • Human Universe • Science

Is Luck Real?

Do you make your own luck or does luck make you? We find luck, good and bad, in casinos, basketball courts, genetics labs and the subatomic world. It's a journey that will radically revise your understanding of the laws of nature and the human brain.

Through the Wormhole • Science

Is Reality Real?

Do we live in the "real world" or is it all in our mind? Our perception of reality is controlled by society. Thanks to "the optimism bias", we make unrealistic assessments about our own reality. Human senses capture only a small part of nature.

Through the Wormhole • Science

Can We Survive the Death of the Sun?

We are all at the mercy of the Sun. Its glowing disc sustains nearly all life on Earth. But the Sun also holds a dark secret: someday, our aging, expanding star will bathe the Earth in a fiery holocaust. Everything we know will turn to hot, bubbling, plasma.

Through the Wormhole • Science

Will We Become God?

Humanity’s potential seems limitless. But could we become as powerful as God?

Through the Wormhole • Science

Clear Blue Skies

Professor Cox ends his homage to British Science by looking at how discoveries are made.

Science Britannica • Science

Method and Madness

Brian Cox leads the way through 300 years of British science.

Science Britannica • Science

Frenkenstein's Monsters

Professor Cox grapples with science's darker side, asking why, when science has done so much for us, it often gets such a bad press.

Science Britannica • Science

Is Anything Real?

We're limited by our senses. How can we define what "real" means?

Science

Dark

Prof. Jim Al-Khalili investigates the 99 per cent of the cosmos that is hidden in the dark.

Light and Dark • Science

Light

Professor Jim Al-Khalili tells the story of how we used light to reveal the cosmos.

Light and Dark • Science

Space, Time & Videotape with Brian Cox

Brian Cox is joined by Brian Blessed and Alice Roberts. On the agenda are his TV idols from both science fiction and science fact, as well as a whole universe of other stuff.

Science

Chemistry

James May distills the secrets of all you need to know about chemistry.

2012 • James May's Things You Need to Know • Science

Defeating Gravity

Flight takes more than wings. We need the right kind of air, the perfect materials cooked up over billions of years, and cosmic forces that are just right for us to leave the ground without tumbling off into space.

2013 • Big History • Science

Out of Sight

Using new imaging technology, Richard Hammond journeys beyond the visible spectrum.

Richard Hammond's Invisible Worlds • Science

Can We Have Unlimited Power?

The story of how power has been harnessed from wind, steam and from inside the atom.

2010 • The Story of Science • Science

Taboos of Science

Hank discusses some of the taboos which have plagued scientific inquiry in the past and a few that still exist today.

Science

What is our Future?

In a powerful conclusion, Brian pieces together this story of creation that started with what Einstein called the 'happiest thought of his life' - the moment that he realised that gravity was far stranger than anyone had imagined. In an incredible experiment inside the largest vacuum chamber, Brian reveals how Einstein formulated a new theory of gravity, which ultimately took us back to the big bang. And how in doing so, we humans found our true place in space and time.

2014 • Human Universe • Science

Time Travel

The promise of time travel has long been one of the world's favorite scientific "what-ifs?" Hawking explores all the possibilities, warping the very fabric of time and space as he goes.

1997 • Stephen Hawking's Universe • Science

Aliens

Hawking joins science and imagination to explore one of the most important mysteries facing humankind - the possibility of alien, intelligent life and the likelihood of future "contact."

1997 • Stephen Hawking's Universe • Science

The Science of Dust

All we are is dust in the (cosmic) wind.

Science

9 year old discusses the meaning of life and the universe

9 year old discusses the meaning of life, free will, alternate universes, and alien lifeforms.

2012 • Science

The Moust Astounding Fact

Astrophysicist Dr. Neil DeGrasse Tyson was asked by a reader of TIME magazine, "What is the most astounding fact you can share with us about the Universe?" This is his answer.

2012 • Science