Dawn of the Mammals • 2013 • episode "Part 2" • Rise of Animals: Triumph of the Vertebrates

Category: Nature
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This episode reveals how mammals developed from tiny nocturnal forest dwellers to the dominant form of life on the planet following the death of the dinosaurs. David explains how the meteoric rise of mammals led to an astounding diversity of life and laid the foundations for the ascent of man.

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