Edge of the Solar System • 2015 • episode "S4E4" • How the Universe Works

Category: Astronomy
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The only reason life on Earth is possible is because of our stable orbit around the Sun. Elsewhere in the Universe, orbits are chaotic, violent and destructive. On the largest scale, orbits are a creative force and construct the fabric of the Universe.

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