Living without money • 2011

Category: Economics
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Is it possible to feel rich without possessions? Does money define who we are and how much we are worth? In the documentary “Living Without Money”, we meet the German woman Heidemarie Schwermer (68) who made a deliberate choice to live without money 14 years ago. One day she cancelled her flat, donated all of her belongings and started a new life based on exchanging favors – without the use of money. The experiences she made totally changed her outlook on life.

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