Speed • 2012 • episode "S2E4" James May's Things You Need to Know

Category: Physics
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James May rapidly and easily explains all you need to know about speed.

James May's Things You Need to Know • 0 • 9 episodes •

Einstein

James May reveals a world of facts about Albert Einstein and his groundbreaking theories.

2012 • People

The Human Body

James uses motion graphics to help find the answers to key questions about the human body

2011 • Health

The Universe

James May takes a journey of discovery across the universe.

2011 • Astronomy

The Weather

James May asks the big questions about the weather, including what is a cloud?

2011 • Environment

The Brain

James May cranks open your cranium to reveal what's really taking place inside your head.

2012 • Brain

Evolution

James May treks into the wilderness to learn about Darwin's theory of natural selection.

2012 • Nature

Speed

James May rapidly and easily explains all you need to know about speed.

2012 • Physics

Engineering

James May gives a nuts and bolts explanation of the fascinating science of engineering.

2012 • Nature

Chemistry

James May distills the secrets of all you need to know about chemistry.

2012 • Science

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