The Nano Revolution • 2011

Category: Technology
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It’s a universe where scientists explore matter on a scale 80,000 times smaller than a human hair. Nanotechnology promises groundbreaking solutions to the most serious problems that threaten our future, but it’s also a realm that poses serious philosophical, political and ethical questions. We have always counted on new technologies to help us shape our world. Now researchers are crossing another technological frontier. In this nano-dimension they’re learning to manipulate the most intimate mechanics of life and they promise us more control of our bodies and of our environment. This three-part series explores a mysterious and unknown universe, the world of the infinitesimally small, and the revolution it promises.

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