The Story of Information • 2012 • episode "2/2" Order and Disorder

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Professor Jim Al-Khalili discovers the intriguing story of how we discovered the rules that drive the universe. (Part 2: The Story of Information) Professor Jim Al-Khalili investigates one of the most important concepts in the world today - information. He discovers how we harnessed the power of symbols, everything from the first alphabet to the electric telegraph through to the modern digital age. But on this journey he learns that information isn't just about human communication, it's woven very profoundly into the fabric of reality.

Order and Disorder • 0 • 2 episodes •

The Story of Energy

Professor Jim Al-Khalili discovers the intriguing story of how we discovered the rules that drive the universe. (Part 1: The Story of Energy) Energy is vital to us all, but what exactly is energy? In attempting to answer this question Jim investigates a strange set of laws that link together everything from engines to humans to stars. It turns out that energy, so critical to daily existence, actually helps us make sense of the entire universe.

2012 • Physics

The Story of Information

Professor Jim Al-Khalili discovers the intriguing story of how we discovered the rules that drive the universe. (Part 2: The Story of Information) Professor Jim Al-Khalili investigates one of the most important concepts in the world today - information. He discovers how we harnessed the power of symbols, everything from the first alphabet to the electric telegraph through to the modern digital age. But on this journey he learns that information isn't just about human communication, it's woven very profoundly into the fabric of reality.

2012 • Physics

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