Can We Have Unlimited Power? • 2010 • episode "4/6" The Story of Science

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The story of how power has been harnessed from wind, steam and from inside the atom.

The Story of Science • 2010 • 6 episodes •

What Is Out There?

How we came to understand our planet was not at the centre of everything in the cosmos.

2010 • Creativity

What is the World Made Of?

How atomic theories and concepts of quantum physics underpin modern technology.

2010 • Creativity

Can We Have Unlimited Power?

The story of how power has been harnessed from wind, steam and from inside the atom.

2010 • Science

How Did We Get Here?

Michael Mosley tells how scientists came to explain the diversity of life on earth.

2010 • Science

Who Are We?

The sciences of brain anatomy and psychology have offered different visions of who we are.

2010 • Brain

What Is The Secret of Life?

The story of how the secret of life has been examined through the prism of the human body.

2010 • Science

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