Creation • 2010 • episode "1/4" Life of Oceans

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At four billion years old, the ocean is nearly as ancient as the planet itself. Find out the story of its turbulent beginnings.

Life of Oceans • 2010 • 4 episodes •

Transformations

The Census of Marine Life - a ten-year effort by scientists from around the world to answer the age-old question, "What lives in the sea?" It was an international effort to asses the diversity, distribution, and abundance of marine life in our ocean, and the project offically concluded in October 2010.

Environment

Creation

At four billion years old, the ocean is nearly as ancient as the planet itself. Find out the story of its turbulent beginnings.

2010 • Nature

Deep Mysteries

With technological advances allowing scientists to go deeper and deeper beneath the waves, catch a glimpse of the deep-sea beasts lurking below.

2010 • Nature

Threats

Human activity has had a colossal impact on our coastlines. Can our ecosystems recover through careful marine protection plans?

2010 • Nature

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