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Descent into Hell • 2017 • episode "S01E03" The Great War in Numbers

Category: History
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By January 1916 the war had become a stalemate. Millions had died and yet no side had achieved a decisive breakthrough. Austria-Hungary tripled the size of its armies to five million men. Germany doubled its forces to seven million. And in Britain men were volunteering to fight at the rate of up to 33,000 a day.

The Great War in Numbers • 2017 • 6 episodes •

The March to War

The opening episode tells the story of the outbreak of war in 1914. In the decades since the last European War the world changed.

2017 • History

Weapons of War

By the beginning of 1915 the horrific killing power of machine guns and artillery had taught all sides that the only way to survive was to find shelter and dig in.

2017 • History

Descent into Hell

By January 1916 the war had become a stalemate. Millions had died and yet no side had achieved a decisive breakthrough. Austria-Hungary tripled the size of its armies to five million men. Germany doubled its forces to seven million. And in Britain men were volunteering to fight at the rate of up to 33,000 a day.

2017 • History

The Home Front

How the First World War transformed life on the home front, from a greater number of women in the workplace to increased government interference in everyday life.

2017 • History

Total War

Episode five tells how, after 1916 and the hell of the Somme and Verdun, the imperial powers redoubled their efforts to crush their enemies.

2017 • History

Endgame

The numbers will favoured one side, then the other in 1918. When the Bolsheviks took Russia out of the war, millions of German and Austro-Hungarian troops were freed up to attack Britain and Belgium, France and Italy. But across the Atlantic, America was training an army of two-million men.

2017 • History

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