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Digits • 2020 • episode "S1E4" Connected - The Hidden Science of Everything

Category: Math
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Latif explores a law of numerical probability that applies to classical music, contemporary social media, tax fraud and perhaps the entire universe.

Connected - The Hidden Science of Everything • 2020 • 6 episodes •

Surveillance

Ever feel like you're being watched? Well, you may be right. Latif explores the sometimes cute, often creepy ways surveillance pervades our lives.

2020 • Science

Poop

Sure, it's smelly, dirty and gross. But excrement is more complex than we think, holding many secrets, many problems and, potentially, many solutions.

2020 • Technology

Dust

A speck of dust seems insignificant, but a swarm of it can do everything from generating oxygen to tempering hurricanes to fertilizing the rainforest.

2020 • Technology

Digits

Latif explores a law of numerical probability that applies to classical music, contemporary social media, tax fraud and perhaps the entire universe.

2020 • Math

Clouds

How does the cloud above your head connect to the cloud that stores your data? The answer involves a shipwreck and a shark-proof garden hose.

2020 • Science

Nukes

They may be our worst creations. But nuclear bombs also taught us things about ourselves and our world that we couldn’t have learned any other way.

2020 • Technology

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