Edge of Space • episode "S2E4" Extreme Universe

Category: Astronomy
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Delve into the unknown on a journey into deep oceans and deep space, as we seek the answers to some of mankind's most unfathomable questions.

Extreme Universe • 0 • 6 episodes •

Is Anyone Out There?

Travel to the farthest reaches of the universe, as this exploratory space documentary series asks 'is anyone out there'?

Astronomy

Collision Course

Witness some of the most violent impacts in the universe, and meet the people protecting us from the fallout of these cosmic collisions.

Astronomy

Space Storms

Witness the relentless power of Earth's worst weather, before travelling the universe to find the 17,500kmh winds and methane storms of space.

Astronomy

Edge of Space

Delve into the unknown on a journey into deep oceans and deep space, as we seek the answers to some of mankind's most unfathomable questions.

Astronomy

Time Bombs

Planets, moons and stars can all face violent upheaval at any moment. Is it possible to predict when Mother Nature will strike?

Astronomy

Star Gates

Throughout history, humans have been fascinated by the stars. Discover how astronomy played a crucial role in early civilisations.

Astronomy

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Misconceptions About the Universe

The expanding universe is a complicated place. During inflation the universe expanded faster than light, but that's something that actually happens all the time, it's happening right now. This doesn't violate Einstein's theory of relativity since nothing is moving through space faster than light, it's just that space itself is expanding such that far away objects are receding rapidly from each other. Common sense would dictate that objects moving away from us faster than light should be invisible, but they aren't. This is because light can travel from regions of space which are superluminal relative to us into regions that are subluminal. So our observable universe is bigger than our Hubble sphere - it's limited by the particle horizon, the distance light could travel to us since the beginning of time as we know it.

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Star Clusters

Last week we covered multiple star systems, but what if we added thousands or even millions of stars to the mix? A star cluster. There are different kinds of clusters, though. Open clusters contain hundreds or thousands of stars held together by gravity. They’re young, and evaporate over time, their stars let loose to roam space freely. Globular clusters, on the other hand, are larger, have hundreds of thousands of stars, and are more spherical. They’re very old, a significant fraction of the age of the Universe itself, and that means their stars have less heavy elements in them, are redder, and probably don’t have planets (though we’re not really sure).

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Strangest Alien Worlds

Discoveries of new planets have revealed countless worlds much stranger than Earth. Some of these strange worlds don't have stars; others are made out of diamonds. Will we ever find a planet like Earth, or are these distant worlds stranger than fiction?

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Moons

Are moons the most likely place to find life beyond the Earth? Explore the 300 that lie within our solar system which might give an idea of the Earth's turbulent past.

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The Universe's Greatest Hits

From the mission that saw Pluto for the first time to the Mars rovers, a new breed of explorers are risking their careers, and even their lives, to lead humanity to worlds we have never seen and tackle the mysteries of life itself.

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The death of the universe

The shape, contents and future of the universe are all intricately related. We know that it's mostly flat; we know that it's made up of baryonic matter (like stars and planets), but mostly dark matter and dark energy; and we know that it's expanding constantly, so that all stars will eventually burn out into a cold nothingness. Renée Hlozek expands on the beauty of this dark ending.

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