End of an Era: The Final Shuttle Launch • 1989 • episode "6/10" The Sagan Series

Category: Astronomy
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"You might have thought, as I did then, that our species would be on Mars before the century was over"

The Sagan Series • 0 • 10 episodes •

The Frontier Is Everywhere

What are our frontiers?

1989 • Astronomy

Life Looks for Life

It's our fate to live in the dark...

1989 • Astronomy

A Reassuring Fable

Carl Sagan talks about religion and the universe

1989 • Astronomy

Per Aspera Ad Astra

"It is beyond our powers to predict the future"

1989 • Astronomy

Decide To Listen

Our species has discovered a way to communicate through the dark, to transcend immense distances

1989 • Astronomy

End of an Era: The Final Shuttle Launch

"You might have thought, as I did then, that our species would be on Mars before the century was over"

1989 • Astronomy

The Long Astronomical Perspective

Carl Sagan talks about our future and the exploration of space

1989 • Astronomy

Gift of Apollo

Humanity's first steps on the Moon.

1989 • Astronomy

The Humans

Carl Sagan talks about our place in the universe

1989 • Astronomy

Pale Blue Dot

"That's home. That's us. On it, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever lived.."

1990 • Astronomy

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