End of Days • 2017 • episode "2/2" Brian Cox: Life Of A Universe

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Professor Brian Cox tells the biggest story of them all. Inspired by the Southern Sky as he travels Australia, Brian reveals our very latest understanding about how the Universe began & how it will end.

Brian Cox: Life Of A Universe • 2017 • 1 episode •

End of Days

Professor Brian Cox tells the biggest story of them all. Inspired by the Southern Sky as he travels Australia, Brian reveals our very latest understanding about how the Universe began & how it will end.

2017 • Astronomy

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