Heart of Darkness • 2014 • episode "2/3" Wild Nile

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Pouring out of Lake Victoria, the Nile bursts into life, growing vast with sandy banks and mighty rapids. Under the scorching sun, elephant herds leave the savannah to drink and bathe in the river.

Wild Nile • 2014 • 3 episodes •

Paradise Found

The Nile has many sources. This episode looks at the headwaters in the Great East African Rift Valley and the Rwenzori Mountains' melting snow.

2014 • Nature

Heart of Darkness

Pouring out of Lake Victoria, the Nile bursts into life, growing vast with sandy banks and mighty rapids. Under the scorching sun, elephant herds leave the savannah to drink and bathe in the river.

2014 • Nature

River of Kings

During the rainy season, the Blue Nile tributary is more powerful than the main river. Follow it from the Ethiopian highlands to the delta.

2014 • Nature

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