How to Build a Sci Fi Robot • 2009 • episode "S1E9" Physics of the Impossible

Category: Physics
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From Terminator to Star Wars, no sci fi movie is complete without an intelligent robot! Theoretical physicist Dr. Michio Kaku reveals how artificial intelligence will be created and how smart robots could threaten us all.

Physics of the Impossible • 2009 • 12 episodes •

How To Explore The Universe

Exploring the universe on a ship that can boldly go where no man has gone before isn't just a sci fi dream. Dr Michio Kaku reveals how we really could one day build a warp drive and set out on our own star trek.

2009 • Physics

How To Travel To A Parallel Universe

A gateway to a world of limitless possibilities. The parallel universes of science fiction turn out to be as real as they are fantastic. Dr Michio Kaku reveals how future civilizations could build a machine to reach one.

2009 • Physics

How To Blow Up A Planet

The crosshairs are lined up, a death ray is fired and a planet is vaporized. Sci fi fantasy? Not according to Dr Michio Kaku, who draws up blueprints to show how a real death star might work. The technology could be here sooner than you think!

2009 • Physics

How To Teleport

Teleportation is sci fi's most exciting way to travel. Imagine zapping your molecules through space on a transporter beam right out of Star Trek - Dr Michio Kaku reveals how we might all one day be saying 'beam me up Scotty'.

2009 • Physics

How to Become Invisible

A cloak of invisibility isn't just some Harry Potter fantasy- Dr. Michio Kaku draws up the blueprints for a real invisibility cloak and reveals that vanishing into thin air could be much closer than we think.

2009 • Physics

How To Travel Through.Time

Hurtling back in time to visit the dinosaurs is not an impossible fantasy! Dr Michio Kaku draws up blueprints for a working time machine that will let us visit the past and travel back to the future.

2009 • Physics

How to Build a Starship

Hurtling across the galaxy in a starship powered by anti-matter isn't some sci fi writer's impossible dream, as Dr Michio Kaku proves when he reveals his blueprints for a spacecraft that can journey to the stars. Alpha Centaurii is nearer than you think.

2009 • Physics

How to Build a Light Saber

A sword made of pure light that can cut through anything, the lightsaber is a truly awesome weapon. But it's not just a science fiction fantasy, Dr Michio Kaku reveals how we could one day build a real working lightsaber.

2009 • Physics

How to Build a Sci Fi Robot

From Terminator to Star Wars, no sci fi movie is complete without an intelligent robot! Theoretical physicist Dr. Michio Kaku reveals how artificial intelligence will be created and how smart robots could threaten us all.

2009 • Physics

How to Become a Superhero

Imagine turning yourself into a crime fighting super hero just like Batman or Iron man. Dr Michio Kaku designs a suit that would give the wearer the super powers of a comic book super hero. Take that bad guys!

2009 • Physics

How to Build a Flying Saucer

Defying gravity and hurtling through space: the flying saucer is the ultimate science fiction vehicle. Using cutting-edge research and theoretical physics, Dr. Michio Kaku reveals how one day we could all be using the aliens' favorite mode of transport.

2009 • Physics

How to Build a Force Field

Every starship needs armor to protect it from asteroids and enemy attack- Dr. Michio Kaku reveals how cutting edge science could be used to create force fields that might one day save our space craft from an alien onslaught.

2009 • Physics

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