Hubble the Final Frontier • 2015

Category: Astronomy
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An animated Odyssey about the Hubble Telescope produced by ESA/ESO and Gala Media. Amazing visuals of Hubble in orbit and its discoveries about the Universe accompanied by the breathtaking music of award winner composer Jennifer Athena Galatis.

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