Humans in 1000 Years • 2015 AsapSCIENCE

Category: People
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What will humanity look like in 1000 years? Watch as we cover some cutting-edge innovations happening today. Thanks to the National Geographic Channel for sponsoring this video!

AsapSCIENCE • 2015 • 5 episodes •

Are You Sitting Too Much?

Is sitting too much killing you?

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Your Brain on Drugs: Marijuana

This is what you look like, on the inside, when smoking cannabis. The effects of Marijuana on your brain, and how it defines your experience.

Brain

The 9 BEST Scientific Study Tips

Studying strategies. Help your brain acquire information in a scientific proven way!

2015 • Lifehack

Humans in 1000 Years

What will humanity look like in 1000 years? Watch as we cover some cutting-edge innovations happening today. Thanks to the National Geographic Channel for sponsoring this video!

2015 • People

Amazing Body Facts

Our bodies are pretty incredible, here's why!

2015 • Health

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The Five Major World Religions

It's perfectly human to grapple with questions, like 'Where do we come from?' and 'How do I live a life of meaning?' These existential questions are central to the five major world religions -- and that's not all that connects these faiths. John Bellaimey explains the intertwined histories and cultures of Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity and Islam.

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Survival of the Fabulous

Are gay men actually born gay? If so, what causes this and how could homosexuality have survived the evolutionary process? Ever since openly gay filmmaker Bryce Sage came out of the closet, he has struggled to answer these fundamental questions. Bryce sets out on a cross-country and around the world journey to ferret out the answers. Along the way, he confronts his own homosexuality and family history, exploring the nature vs. nurture side of the issue. He’ll bombard his brainwaves with gay and straight erotica to determine just how fundamentally gay his brain really is and he’ll talk to animal biologists about their studies of homosexuality in other species. There is documented evidence of homosexuality in over two hundred. Bryce becomes an amateur detective, trying to crack the code of his genes. He discovers that in Samoa every family has a male member who is either gay or is encouraged to become more feminine to support familial needs.

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Arthur C Clarke

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Population statistics are like crystal balls -- when examined closely, they can help predict a country's future (and give important clues about the past). Kim Preshoff explains how using a visual tool called a population pyramid helps policymakers and social scientists make sense of the statistics, using three different countries' pyramids as examples.

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