Invisible Universe Revealed

Category: Astronomy
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Follow the historic rescue of Hubble—the space telescope that unveiled the cosmos.

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Telescopes

Today Phil explains how telescopes work and offers up some astronomical shopping advice.

#6Crash Course AstronomyAstronomy

One Voice in the Cosmic Fugue

Sagan discusses the story of the Heike crab and artificial selection of crabs resembling samurai warriors, as an opening into a larger discussion of evolution through natural selection (and the pitfalls of intelligent design). Among the topics are the development of life on the Cosmic Calendar and the Cambrian explosion; the function of DNA in growth; genetic replication, repairs, and mutation; the common biochemistry of terrestrial organisms; the creation of the molecules of life in the Miller-Urey experiment; and speculation on alien life (such as life in Jupiter's clouds). In the Cosmos Update ten years later, Sagan remarks on RNA also controlling chemical reactions and reproducing itself and the different roles of comets (potentially carrying organic molecules or causing the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event).

2/13Cosmos: A Personal Voyage • 1980 • Astronomy

The Two Sisters - Earth & Mars

Professor Brian Cox continues his tour of the solar system revealing that it was once home to not one, but two blue planets.

2/5The Planets 2019 • 2019 • Astronomy

Magic Without Lies

The man who stumbled on a hole in the reality of quantum mechanics and the still-unfolding technology that made it possible.

9/13Cosmos: Possible Worlds • 2020 • Astronomy

Hunt for the First Star

A spectacular journey to the birth of stars and matter a billion years after the big bang. Scientists look for evidence of an extraordinary phenomenon known as the Cosmic Dawn, a dramatic moment in the history of the universe when the very first stars were created.

2015 • Astronomy

The death of the universe

The shape, contents and future of the universe are all intricately related. We know that it's mostly flat; we know that it's made up of baryonic matter (like stars and planets), but mostly dark matter and dark energy; and we know that it's expanding constantly, so that all stars will eventually burn out into a cold nothingness. Renée Hlozek expands on the beauty of this dark ending.

TED-EdAstronomy