Land of Ice and Snow • 2016 • episode "1/5" Wildest Europe

Category: Nature

Explore the living nature of the icy landscape of northern Europe, including the golden eagle in the Scottish Cairngorms and the polar bears of Svalbard archipelago in Norway.

Wildest Europe • 0 • 5 episodes •

Land of Ice and Snow

Explore the living nature of the icy landscape of northern Europe, including the golden eagle in the Scottish Cairngorms and the polar bears of Svalbard archipelago in Norway.

2016 • Nature

Rivers Lakes and Oceans

Meet the fauna of the rivers of Europe, including the world's only underwater spider, European river otter and the golden jackal of the Danube Delta.

2016 • Nature

The Alps

From the mountains to the sea, from the scorching desert to the arctic tundra, explore Europe's last great wilderness - full of a delicious and surprising burst of life.

2016 • Nature

Forest and Woodlands

The program introduces the European wilderness and its rich life.

2016 • Nature

Arid Lands

Explore Europe's last great wildernesses - full of a stunning and surprising explosion of life.

2016 • Nature

You might also like

Trapped in Paradise

The Galapagos Islands are home to some animals that washed up on the islands millions of years ago and have made adaptations. Penguins, iguanas, tortoises and cormorants have changed so they can survive the harsh climate. But possibly the oddest adaptation is that of the Vampire finch.

2017 • Wild GalapagosNature

Somewhere in Spacetime

Professor Brian Cox follows Earth's epic journey through space. He takes to the air in a top-secret fighter jet to race the spin of the planet and reverse the passage of the day. In Brazil, a monstrous wave that surges up the Amazon River provides an epic ride of a different kind - chased by a top surfer through the rainforest, this tidal wave marks Earth's constant dance with the Moon. Greenland experiences some of the biggest swings in seasons in the world, but despite the deep freeze, the harsh winter brings opportunity to the Inuit people who live there. All this spectacle here on Earth signals that we are thundering through the universe at breakneck speed. Brian explains why we can't feel it and how understanding motion brings us to understanding the nature of space and time itself, leading to the astonishing conclusion that the past, present and future all exist right now.

2016 • Forces of Nature With Brian CoxNature

The Hardest Challenge

This opening episode reveals the extraordinary strategies used by both predators and prey.

2015 • The HuntNature

River of Life

Once a rich wilderness teeming with lions, tigers and cheetahs, the Gangetic plains of northern India have been transformed into the most densely populated place on Earth. The film explores the impact of this tide of humanity on the wildlife of the plains - from the all-out war between elephants and villagers to worship of the deadly cobra.

2007 • GangesNature


David Attenborough explores the courtship displays of flame bowerbirds and pufferfish.

2014 • Life StoryNature

O2: The Molecule that Made Our World

Oxygen – we all need it, we can't live without it. It's integral to life on this planet. And it's probable that, as you watch this film, you will be breathing in an oxygen atom that was also breathed by Genghis Khan – or by the first ever apes to stand upright on the plains of Africa. The oxygen that we breathe is made from two oxygen atoms joined together – O2. They were first joined more than 3 billion years ago by the earliest blue-green algae to evolve. The oxygen molecule first came from bacteria and was present in the fires that destroyed the dinosaurs and the chemical reactions in all human cells, and as ozone they protect the earth from radiation. Since then, both together and apart, they've had the most extraordinary adventures. Each of the two atoms in an oxygen molecule is virtually indestructible – so they have been first-hand players in some of the most dramatic events in the whole of Earth's history. It's often said that we are breathing the same oxygen that the cavemen did. The life of a single molecule of oxygen is traced on it's astonishing journey spanning millions of years, from its creation, into photosynthesis, through the age of the dinosaurs, early man, and on into today.

2008 • Nature