Live to Learn • 2017

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These 9 life lessons from comedian Tim Minchin will make you laugh -- and learn

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A Week Without Lying

Deception is an integral part of human nature and it is estimated we all lie up to nine times a day. But what if we created a world in which we couldn't lie? In a radical experiment, pioneering scientists from across Europe have come together to make this happen. Brand new technology is allowing them to rig three British people to make it impossible for them to lie undetected. Then they will be challenged to live for a whole week without telling a single lie. It is a bold social experiment to discover the role of deception in our lives - to investigate the impact lying has on our mental state and the consequences of it for our relationships, and to ask whether the world would be a better or worse place if we couldn't lie.

Horizon • 2018 • Lifehack

Live to Learn

These 9 life lessons from comedian Tim Minchin will make you laugh -- and learn

2017 • Lifehack

The Missing Tile Syndrome

Have you ever thought to yourself, "I wish I were ____"? Adjectives may have included: thinner, taller, smarter, etc. If so, you're like virtually everyone else, and afflicted by "The Missing Tile Syndrome." As Dennis Prager explains, we often focus on the missing tile(s) in our lives, which robs us of happiness. In five minutes, learn how to fix your focus.

PragerU • 2014 • Lifehack

Knowledge

The way TV pollutes our minds with the wrong kind of information.

6/6How TV Ruined Your Life • 2011 • Lifehack

Human 2.0

Meet the scientific prophets who claim we are on the verge of creating a new type of human - a human v2.0.

Lifehack

Should you trust your first impression?

You can't help it; sometimes, you just get a bad feeling about someone that's hard to shake. So, what's happening in your brain when you make that critical (and often lasting) first judgment? Peter Mende-Siedlecki shares the social psychology of first impressions -- and why they may indicate that, deep down, people are basically good.

TED-EdLifehack