Night • 2014 • episode "2/2" 24 Hours on Earth

Category: Nature
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An exploration of how the sun's power still rules the night time world, as its light, reflected in the moon, is a ghost sun for tiny hunting tarsiers and an aphrodisiac for Australian corals.

24 Hours on Earth • 0 • 2 episodes •

Day

This fascinating series travels through a virtual day, from dawn to dusk to night, showing how different animals have adapted to make the most out of every moment.

2014 • Nature

Night

An exploration of how the sun's power still rules the night time world, as its light, reflected in the moon, is a ghost sun for tiny hunting tarsiers and an aphrodisiac for Australian corals.

2014 • Nature

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