Off the Scale • episode "3/3" Richard Hammond's Invisible Worlds

Category: Physics
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Richard Hammond explores the astonishing miniature universe all around us.

Richard Hammond's Invisible Worlds • 3 episodes •

Out of Sight

Using new imaging technology, Richard Hammond journeys beyond the visible spectrum.

Science

Speed Limits

Using high-speed cameras, Richard reveals the world hidden in the time it takes to blink.

Physics

Off the Scale

Richard Hammond explores the astonishing miniature universe all around us.

Physics

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