Opium • episode "2/4" Addicted to Pleasure

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Scotland is plagued with over 50,000 drug addicts and one of the roots of this addiction is the opium poppy.

Addicted to Pleasure • 4 episodes •

Sugar

How sugar cane fuelled a consumer revolution but is now responsible for serious ailments.

Health

Opium

Scotland is plagued with over 50,000 drug addicts and one of the roots of this addiction is the opium poppy.

Health

Tobacco

Growing up in the streets of Dundee, actor Brian Cox was surrounded by tobacco. His entire family either smoked it or chewed it and yet Brian reveals, he never took up the habit. To find out why not, Brian travels to Virginia in the US to discover how the habit of smoking kick-started the British Empire and created a global market of addicts.

Health

Whisky

Today, whisky is a source of Scottish pride; it's one of the UK's few growth industries. In this last episode, actor Brian Cox reveals how whisky was born and shaped in opposition to the British tax system, and how that history forged the character of Scotland's national drink.

Health

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The benefits of good posture

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Curing Alzheimer's

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