Part 2 • 2016 • episode "2/2" NASA's Ten Greatest Achievements

Category: Astronomy
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Since its formation in the early 60’s, NASA has continued to be the leading power in space exploration. Working with other space agencies, it has contributed substantially to the ongoing exploration of our universe, achieving incredible firsts that span the decades.

NASA's Ten Greatest Achievements • 2016 • 2 episodes •

Part 1

Part 1 of this series chronicles NASA’s finest accomplishments in space exploration – the moments that inspired generations over the last 50 years. Re-discover the highlights of mankind’s progress including achievements such as the Freedom 7.

2016 • Astronomy

Part 2

Since its formation in the early 60’s, NASA has continued to be the leading power in space exploration. Working with other space agencies, it has contributed substantially to the ongoing exploration of our universe, achieving incredible firsts that span the decades.

2016 • Astronomy

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