Perfect cooking • 2011 • episode "2/2" The Science of Everyday Living

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Science helps you figure out the correct way to cook and what utensils, pots and pans are the most effective to use so that your meals turn out just right.

The Science of Everyday Living • 2011 • 2 episodes •

Perfect Cleaning

Science explains why some cleaning methods work better than others, and that we do not need to purchase multiple cleansers when a few basic ingredients from our pantry and our local pharmacy can get the entire house spic and span.

2011 • Lifehack

Perfect cooking

Science helps you figure out the correct way to cook and what utensils, pots and pans are the most effective to use so that your meals turn out just right.

2011 • Lifehack

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