Galapagos with David Attenborough • 2010 • 1 episode • 2h:51m

Sir David Attenborough has captured a new species of pink iguana on film for the first time. In his new series about the Galapagos Islands, the veteran broadcaster was thrilled to come face to face with a creature missed by Charles Darwin. Now he will give viewers their first glimpse of the rare, pink iguana – which lives on top of a volcano “It’s a remarkable thing in this day and age when you think about the number of scientists per square metre in the Galapagos, and yet suddenly we have discovered a new species,” Sir David said. “A little periwinkle or something which nobody has identified before is one thing, but this is more than that. “You would have thought because these islands have been pretty well raked over by scientists for 150 years that the basics would be pretty well established, but that they should discover a new species of iguana is quite extraordinary. The new iguana will feature in the third episode of Galapagos

The Making Of

Making of David Attenborough’s Galapagos, which is aired first, offers an unrivalled and actually far more interesting view of the dramas that went into capturing all that footage. The way all the shots have been so calmly edited together makes the process look so effortless, but nothing could be further from the truth. There are broken helicopters and broken camera cables that threaten the whole enterprise and the grunting of mating tortoises that threaten to drown out Attenborough’s pieces to camera. This making of programme also includes the discovery of a previously unknown species of pink iguana, as well as the final television appearance of the last-remaining member of another species – the iconic long-necked tortoise known as Lonesome George. “He’s about 80 years old and he’s getting a bit creaky in his joints,” whispers Attenborough. “As indeed am I.”

4/4 • 2010 • Nature