Planet Earth • 2006 • 5 episodes • 8h:45m

As of its release in early 2007, Planet Earth is quite simply the greatest nature/wildlife series ever produced. Following the similarly monumental achievement of The Blue Planet: Seas of Life, this astonishing 11-part BBC series is brilliantly narrated by Sir David Attenborough and sensibly organized so that each 50-minute episode covers a specific geographical region and/or wildlife habitat (mountains, caves, deserts, shallow seas, seasonal forests, etc.) until the entire planet has been magnificently represented by the most astonishing sights and sounds you'll ever experience from the comforts of home.

From Pole to Pole

"Planet Earth" travels around the Earth, finding where the sun always shines and where it's rarely seen. Next, they find where water is abundant and where it's scarce.

1/11 • 2006 • Nature

Great Plains

The great plains are the vast open spaces of our planet. These immense wilderness areas are seemingly empty.

7/11 • 2006 • Nature

Jungles

David Attenborough's natural history series. Tropical rainforests cover just three per cent of our planet yet are home to a staggering 50 per cent of the world's species.

8/11 • 2006 • Nature

Seasonal Forests

The Taiga forest, on the edge of the Arctic, is a silent world of stunted conifers. The trees may be small but filming from the air reveals its true scale. A third of all trees on Earth grow here and during the short summer they produce enough oxygen to change the atmosphere.

10/11 • 2006 • Nature

Ocean Deep

David Attenborough narrates the final episode in the documentary series that shows our planet in all its glory. In this part, he looks at the largest of all habitats - the ocean.

11/11 • 2006 • Nature