Single Kids • 2018 • episode "1/3" Life: First Steps

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Of all nature's babies, single kids have the most to learn. We explore the single kids of African Elephant, African Wildebeest, Australian Red Kangaroo, South American Woolly Monkeys, and Alaskan Sea Otters.

Life: First Steps • 2018 • 3 episodes •

Single Kids

Of all nature's babies, single kids have the most to learn. We explore the single kids of African Elephant, African Wildebeest, Australian Red Kangaroo, South American Woolly Monkeys, and Alaskan Sea Otters.

2018 • Nature

Brothers and Sisters

Having siblings can be tough, especially when you're competing for survival. We explore the challenges faced by different animals that are born with just a few siblings.

2018 • Nature

Outnumbered

Success in the natural world is a gamble. When you are more in number, you are safer if you are the prey and successful if you are the predator. We explore some of the preys and predators in the animal kingdom who use this technique to safeguard their next generation.

2018 • Nature

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