The Key To Science (ft Joan Feynman) • 2011 The Feynman Series

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"When a scientist gazes silently up at the sky..."

The Feynman Series • 2011 • 5 episodes •

Beauty

"I have a friend who is an artist, and sometimes taken a view which I don't agree with very well."

2011 • People

Curiosity

"The world is strange... but when you look at the details, you find out that the rules are very simple..."

2011 • Astronomy

Honours

"Richared Feynman won the nobel prize for physics in 1965. He was considered by many to be the greatest scientific mind since Einstein."

2011 • People

The Key To Science (ft Joan Feynman)

"When a scientist gazes silently up at the sky..."

2011 • People

Think like a Martian

"... we had a lot of little games, like you would say at the dinner table..."

2011 • People

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