The Most Important Question About Abortion • 2015 PragerU

Category: Health
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Is abortion right, or is it wrong? It's the big question that's lost in a societal debate that's mostly focused on legality. But, really, whether it's right or wrong is the most important question about abortion.

PragerU • 2014 - 2017 • 4 episodes •

Rockefeller: The Richest American Who Ever Lived

Was America's first billionaire, John D. Rockefeller, a greedy robber baron, a generous philanthropist, or both? And did the oil tycoon exploit America's poor or give them access to much-needed energy? Historian and Hillsdale College professor Burt Folsom, author of "The Myth of the Robber Barons," reveals the truth about the Rockefeller empire.

2015 • History

The Most Important Question About Abortion

Is abortion right, or is it wrong? It's the big question that's lost in a societal debate that's mostly focused on legality. But, really, whether it's right or wrong is the most important question about abortion.

2015 • Health

The Missing Tile Syndrome

Have you ever thought to yourself, "I wish I were ____"? Adjectives may have included: thinner, taller, smarter, etc. If so, you're like virtually everyone else, and afflicted by "The Missing Tile Syndrome." As Dennis Prager explains, we often focus on the missing tile(s) in our lives, which robs us of happiness. In five minutes, learn how to fix your focus.

2014 • Lifehack

Why Is America So Rich?

Why is America the world's richest nation? Is it mostly because of the government, or is it thanks to entrepreneurs and businessmen?

2017 • Economics

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