The Science Behind 'Genetically Modified Humans' SciShow

Category: Science
Download:

The media have been talking about “genetically modified humans” and “designer babies.” But what they’re really talking about is germ-line engineering: a process that could help eliminate heritable diseases. So why do some scientists want to pause the research?

SciShow • 2014 • 4 episodes •

The Science of Anti-Vaccination

Fewer children in the United States are getting vaccinated. That’s bad news for those kids, and also for public health in general. Often, the response is to argue and debate and get angry at people who are we see as making terrible, irrational decisions. Instead of doing that, let’s use science to understand why this is happening in the first place.

Health

The Science Behind 'Genetically Modified Humans'

The media have been talking about “genetically modified humans” and “designer babies.” But what they’re really talking about is germ-line engineering: a process that could help eliminate heritable diseases. So why do some scientists want to pause the research?

Science

Why Tomatoes Are Fruits, and Strawberries Aren't Berries

Did you know that bananas are berries, but strawberries aren’t? A lot of thought goes into classifying fruits and vegetables, and it all has to do with anatomy.

Science

Human Experimentation: The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly

In the early days of the space race, agency researchers in Russia and at NASA really weren't sure all what would happen to an astronaut in space. They didn't know if a human mind could handle actually seeing Earth or what would happen to the human body when exposed to long periods of weightlessness. Would their blood forget which way to pump? Would their eyeballs shift or their inner ears wig out? They sent up mice and monkeys and dogs, to see what happened, and in 1961, the Russians strapped a man to a rocket headed for orbit. Yuri Gagarin was the first person in space. The ultimate human guinea pig, he survived, becoming an international hero.

2014 • Health

You might also like

Life: The Race Against Time

How the passing of time on Earth affects life on a variety of levels, from the daily opening of a flower's petals to the evolution of the horse. A swift journey through the seasons demonstrates how caribou spend most of their time on the move, while the flying squirrel's body clock, attuned to the rhythms of the Earth, is revealed to be the most accurate in nature.

2/3Time MachineScience

Pop: The Science of Bubbles

Physicist Dr Helen Czerski takes us on an amazing journey into the science of bubbles. Bubbles may seem to be just fun toys, but they are also powerful tools that push back the boundaries of science. The soap bubble with its delicate, fragile skin tells us about how nature works on scales as large as solar system and as small as a single wavelength of light. Then there are underwater bubbles, which matter because they are part of the how the planet works. Out at sea, breaking waves generate huge plumes of bubbles which help the oceans breathe. From the way animals behave to the way drinks taste, Dr Czerski shows how bubbles affect our world in all sorts of unexpected ways. Whether it's the future of ship design or innovative new forms of medical treatment, bubbles play a vital role.

2013 • Science

Across Oceans

Throughout history, human society has run on trade, and trade moved on the oceans. The innovations that allowed faster an more accurate oceanic travel revolutionized to the world. New inventions now help people move on water for fun and recreation.

1/4Speed • 2019 • Science

100,000,000 Years From Now

100,000,000 years from now, a team of alien geologists arrive at a mysterious blue-green planet, and decide to investigate. Here's what they'll find…

It's Okay To Be Smart • 2016 • Science

Will We Become God?

Humanity’s potential seems limitless. But could we become as powerful as God?

S5E09Through the WormholeScience

50 Lies That You Still Believe

From Viking helmets to goldfish only having 3 seconds of memory, to goldfish only having 3 seconds of memory, we count 50 common misconceptions you have about the world :)

2015 • Science