The Story of Your Enslavement

Category: Economics
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The video suggests that the vast majority of populations are treated essentially like farm animals to maximize the profits of the few. Perhaps its most disturbing suggestion is that choices that are made available to us are really nothing more than tricks to encourage the masses to be more productive.

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Part 1

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