What do brains do? • 2014 This Place

Category: Brain
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Brains and nervous systems do a lot of things, but overall their purpose seems to be to allow cells to communicate and behave together. But because gene's generally code for things that help reproduction, you can start to see harsh patterns in behavior.

This Place • 0 • 4 episodes •

What is life? Are viruses alive?

What is it that makes things alive? What if we made robots that could sustain themselves? What if they could mine metals or recycle old robots, reprogram and remake themselves? There's nothing there we would traditional call alive, but they would have at least have the essence of this perpetual rube Goldberg machine.

2014 • Nature

Tragedy of the Commons or The Problem with Open Access

The semantics of the model I'm working from use common goods/common property/ common pool resources (resources used by multiple people) and common property regimes (the institutions or social arrangements between people, the property rights regarding common pool resources).

2015 • Environment

How does do science?

How do we learn properly so we can be right all the time? How can we know that we know, when we don't know what we don't know?

2015 • Science

What do brains do?

Brains and nervous systems do a lot of things, but overall their purpose seems to be to allow cells to communicate and behave together. But because gene's generally code for things that help reproduction, you can start to see harsh patterns in behavior.

2014 • Brain

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