WW2 From the German Perspective • 2023 The Armchair Historian

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This documentary offers a unique perspective on World War II by examining the conflict from the viewpoint of the German military.

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The Armchair Historian • 2023 • 1 episode •

WW2 From the German Perspective

This documentary offers a unique perspective on World War II by examining the conflict from the viewpoint of the German military.

2023 • History

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