Alien Planets • 2020 • episode "S1E1" Space Phenomena

Category: Astronomy | Torrent: | Subtitle:

NASA’s next-generation space telescope TESS (Exoplanet Survey Satellite) has begun its search for Earth-like planets belonging to other star systems. How many of these ‘exoplanets’ can host life, and what kind of lifeforms can evolve in these environments?

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Space Phenomena • 2020 • 2 episodes •

Alien Planets

NASA’s next-generation space telescope TESS (Exoplanet Survey Satellite) has begun its search for Earth-like planets belonging to other star systems. How many of these ‘exoplanets’ can host life, and what kind of lifeforms can evolve in these environments?

2020 • Astronomy

Blackholes

The most common vision of black holes is that they are monstrous and mysterious bodies swallowing everything around them. However, the latest discoveries are drawing a link between black holes and the existence of life.

2020 • Astronomy

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