Black Holes: Heart of Darkness • 2021 • episode "S1E4" Universe BBC

Category: Astronomy
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Professor Brian Cox journeys into a supermassive black hole - a monster that can destroy worlds and stop time, and which is forcing us to reassess our understanding of reality.

Universe BBC • 2021 • 5 episodes •

The Sun: God Star

Since the first star lit up the universe, they have been engines of creation. Professor Brian Cox reveals how, ultimately, stars brought life and meaning to the universe.

2021 • Astronomy

Alien Worlds: The Search for Second Earth

Professor Brian Cox questions whether we are alone in the universe. There might be more planets than stars in our galaxy - but will we find a second Earth?

2021 • Astronomy

The Milky Way: Island of Light

A space mission discovers the dramatic history of the Milky Way. Professor Brian Cox reveals how our galaxy endured multiple collisions as rival galaxies fought for survival.

2021 • Astronomy

Black Holes: Heart of Darkness

Professor Brian Cox journeys into a supermassive black hole - a monster that can destroy worlds and stop time, and which is forcing us to reassess our understanding of reality.

2021 • Astronomy

The Big Bang: Before the Dawn

It’s the ultimate question: why are we here? Cutting-edge space missions take us back 13.8 billion years to the very beginning – the origin of the Universe.

2021 • Astronomy

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