Light Falls: Space, Time, and an Obsession of Einstein • 2019

Category: Physics
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Take a theatrical journey with physicist Brian Greene to uncover how Albert Einstein developed his theory of relativity. In this vivid play, science is illuminated on stage and screen through innovative projections and an original score.

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