Part III • 2008 • episode "S1E3" Pacific Abyss

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As the expedition team near the end of their journey across Micronesia, it's a race against time for the extreme deep divers as they continue their search for new species. As Kate Humble explores the Rock Islands of Palau, Mike DeGruy embarks on a unique training programme. The Newtsuit is an incredible feat of submarine engineering - a bright yellow one-man submersible that Mike has to master before he can venture even deeper into the Pacific abyss.

Pacific Abyss • 2008 • 3 episodes •

Part I

Kate dives to some of the most intact shipwrecks left by World War II, while it is one drama after another for the deep dive team in their quest to find new species.

2008 • Nature

Part II

Off the coast of Micronesia, Kate Humble and her scuba team continue to discover spectacular examples of underwater life. Meanwhile, the deep-sea divers search for previously unseen fish in depths that test the limits of human endurance, but their explorations are hindered by an unexpected equipment failure.

2008 • Nature

Part III

As the expedition team near the end of their journey across Micronesia, it's a race against time for the extreme deep divers as they continue their search for new species. As Kate Humble explores the Rock Islands of Palau, Mike DeGruy embarks on a unique training programme. The Newtsuit is an incredible feat of submarine engineering - a bright yellow one-man submersible that Mike has to master before he can venture even deeper into the Pacific abyss.

2008 • Nature

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