Survival • 2018 • episode "5/10" One Strange Rock

Category: Astronomy

It's not enough for Earth to be habitable; it also has to be lethal for life to thrive. This is the story of how life evolved hand in hand with death. Astronaut host – Jerry Linenger

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One Strange Rock • 2018 • 10 episodes •

Gasp

Astronaut Chris Hadfield reveals the unlikely and unexpectedly interconnected systems that allow life on our planet to breathe.

2018 • Astronomy

Storm

Ever wonder how our planet got here? It was born in a cosmic storm. The violence could have destroyed us, but instead it made us. Astronaut host – Nicole Stott.

2018 • Astronomy

Shield

The epic story of Earth's battle with the sun. Our star would wipe us out in an instant without the incredible planetary shields that protect us. Astronaut host – Jeff Hoffman.

2018 • Astronomy

Genesis

Our rock is special - it's alive. Somehow our planet cooked up stardust and made life. But how did that begin and is it likely elsewhere? Astronaut host – Mae Jemison.

2018 • Astronomy

Survival

It's not enough for Earth to be habitable; it also has to be lethal for life to thrive. This is the story of how life evolved hand in hand with death. Astronaut host – Jerry Linenger

2018 • Astronomy

Escape

Astronaut Chris Hadfield has seen the bullet holes left by asteroids on Earth's surface. Our planet is vulnerable. Could we ever survive elsewhere?

2018 • Astronomy

Terraform

For nearly 4 billion years, life has sculpted almost every part of Earth. But how exactly did life turn this once barren rock into a paradise? Astronaut host – Mike Massimino.

2018 • Astronomy

Alien

All life on Earth started as single-cell bacteria and stayed like that for two billion years. So even if we do find alien life out there, what are the chances of that life being complex like us? Astronaut host – Mae Jemison.

2018 • Astronomy

Awakening

Of all life on Earth, we're the only ones with the smarts to leave our planet. How did our planet make us so intelligent? Astronaut host – Leland Melvin.

2018 • Astronomy

Home

After 665 weightless days in space, NASA's most experienced astronaut, Peggy Whitson, smashes through the atmosphere on her last journey home to planet Earth. With unprecedented filming on board the ISS during Peggy's final mission and with the support of our other featured astronauts, we reveal how their time in space transforms their understanding of our planet's wonders, insights that will change our perspective, too. There is no place like home. Or is there? Just how strange is our rock, and is it really unique in the universe? Astronaut host – Peggy Whitson.

2018 • Astronomy

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