PEOPLE • 108 videos

Infinite Secrets the Genius of Archimedes

In 1991, a small Medieval prayer book was sold at auction. Miraculously, some original writings of Archimedes, the brilliant Greek mathematician, were discovered hidden beneath the religious text. Through scholarly detective work with the help of modern technology, this book now reveals Archimedes' stunningly original concepts, ideas, and theories--revelations that, if known sooner, might have reshaped our world.

2003 • NOVA PBSPeople

Polar People

Each year, over 2000 people apply for jobs in Antarctica, but few are successful. What are the physical and psychological attributes required to work in the most remote location on Earth? Could you snag a job in sub-zero temperatures at an Antarctic station?

2015 • Catalyst: Season 1People

"What the Hell Did I Do?"

Filmmakers spend nearly a decade investigating Robert Durst and his alleged crimes.

2015 • The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert DurstPeople

Family Values

Family and friends of Kathie Durst continue to hunt for the truth about what happened to her.

2015 • The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert DurstPeople

The State of Texas vs. Robert Durst

In 2003, Galveston, Texas, becomes a media circus as the press descends to cover Durst's trial.

2015 • The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert DurstPeople

The Gangsters Daughter

A tip leads a district attorney to re-open the investigation into the disappearance of Kathie Durst.

2015 • The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert DurstPeople

Poor Little Rich Boy

Durst reveals details about his childhood including witnessing his mother's suicide.

2015 • The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert DurstPeople

A Body in the Bay

In 2001, a dismembered corpse is found floating in Galveston Bay, Texas.

2015 • The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert DurstPeople

Think like a Martian

"... we had a lot of little games, like you would say at the dinner table..."

2011 • The Feynman SeriesPeople

The Key To Science (ft Joan Feynman)

"When a scientist gazes silently up at the sky..."

2011 • The Feynman SeriesPeople

Honours

"Richared Feynman won the nobel prize for physics in 1965. He was considered by many to be the greatest scientific mind since Einstein."

2011 • The Feynman SeriesPeople

Beauty

"I have a friend who is an artist, and sometimes taken a view which I don't agree with very well."

2011 • The Feynman SeriesPeople

X-Rated -The Greatest Adult Movies of All Time

Combining scintillating film clips of the 32 greatest adult movies ever produced with in-depth interviews from the biggest stars in the industry, this erotic documentary is the definitive look at the art of carnal films. Hosted by Chanel Preston, with Jenna Jameson, Ron Jeremy, Marilyn Chambers, Christy Canyon, Jessica Drake, Georgina Spelvin and many more.

2015 • People

I Am Bolt

Captivating documentary profiling Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt, the fastest man in history and one of the greatest Olympians of all time. The film follows Bolt as he prepares to go for gold at the 2016 Rio Olympics. Competing in the 100m and 200m races, he attempts to make history by winning these events for a record third time. In addition to following his training, the documentary features archival footage of his life and phenomenal accomplishments. With a career that has already rewritten the record books, Bolt stakes his claim as one of the greatest athletes of all time.

2016 • People

The Art of Discovery

It is hard to imagine a sky without an airplane in it. But David McCullough takes us back to the first days of aviation. We learn about the Wright Brothers, not only through their achievements, but by discovering who they were as people and the early family influences that shaped their characters.

2015 • Curiosity Retreats: 2015 LecturesPeople

Our Declaration

You may think you know who wrote the Declaration of Independence and what it says -- but do you really? Political theorist Danielle Allen looks at the document's origin and originators to give us a picture of the men and the moment in time that shaped the United States of today.

2015 • Curiosity Retreats: 2015 LecturesPeople

Life and Death

A celebrated war photographer, Stephen Dupont has captured images in some of the world's most dangerous regions. Unfortunately this has left him questioning the way he now views life and death and has him seeking a new perspective.

2017 • Tales by LightPeople

Misunderstood Predators

Over the years Eric Cheng has dived with the planet's most magnificent creatures. Now he is determined to use his photography to tell the true story of the most misrepresented and demonized species of all - sharks.

2017 • Tales by LightPeople

Sacred Nature

Award winning wildlife photographers Jonathan and Angela Scott have traveled the world, always returning home to Kenya. There they introduced the world to the big cats of the Maasai Mara and now they are part of its fight for survival

2017 • Tales by LightPeople

The Grammar of Happiness

A language that can be spoken, hummed, or whistled? A language with no unique words for colour or numbers? Linguistics professor Daniel Everett claims that the unique language of the Piraha people of the Amazon is exactly that. More than 30 years ago, he travelled as a missionary into the Amazon rainforest to teach the tribe, but they ended up teaching him. Their way of life and unique form of communication have profoundly changed Everett, and inspired a theory that could undermine the most powerful theory (or theorist) of linguistics.

2012 • People

Sex: A Horizon Guide

Sex is a simple word for a very complex set of desires. It cuts to the core of our passions, our wants, our emotions. But when it goes wrong, it can be the most painful thing of all. Professor Alice Roberts looks through 45 years of Horizon archive to see how science came to understand sex, strived to solve our problems with it, and even help us to do it better. Can science save the day when sex goes wrong?

2013 • People

Searching for Sugar Man

Searching for Sugar Man tells the incredible true story of Rodriguez, the greatest '70s rock icon who never was. Discovered in a Detroit bar in the late '60s by two celebrated producers struck by his soulful melodies and prophetic lyrics, they recorded an album which they believed would secure his reputation as the greatest recording artist of his generation. In fact, the album bombed and the singer disappeared into obscurity amid rumors of a gruesome on-stage suicide. But a bootleg recording found its way into apartheid South Africa and, over the next two decades, he became a phenomenon. The film follows the story of two South African fans who set out to find out what really happened to their hero. Their investigation leads them to a story more extraordinary than any of the existing myths about the artist known as Rodriguez.

2012 • People

The Rules for Rulers

If we want to make the world a better place, we better understand how the world works.

2016 • CGP GreyPeople

My Love, Don't Cross That River

This is a story of a couple in South Korea who share intimate moments after 76 years of marriage.

2013 • People

George Lucas

From Luke Skywalker's light sabre to Darth Vader's Death Star, the Star Wars franchise is one of the defining science fiction works of the later 20th century. George Lucas' prolific imagination has already inspired two generations of scientists and engineers to push the envelope of technology. By introducing computers into the filmmaking process, he changed the way movies are made, and the way we all see the future.

2011 • Prophets of Science FictionPeople

Robert Heinlein

Sci-fi legend Robert Heinlein is a walking contradiction. His stories address themes of patriotism, and duty while stressing the importance of personal freedom and expression. His groundbreaking stories like Starship Troopers and Stranger in a Strange Land continue to challenge readers with a steadfast theme: what is freedom?

2011 • Prophets of Science FictionPeople

Jules Verne

He put a man on the Moon in the Victorian Era. He criticized the Internet...in 1863. Jules Verne is the ultimate futurist, with a legacy of sci-fi stories predicting everything from fuel cell technology to viral advertising. The extraordinary voyages of Jules Verne have inspired art, industry, culture, and technology.

2011 • Prophets of Science FictionPeople

Isaac Asimov

He saved the future from Evil Robots! Isaac Asimov dreamed a better future where we need not fear our own technology. His I, Robot stories of a sci-fi future where robots can do our jobs for us lead to the creation of real-life industrial robots and paved the way for a robo-friendly world.

2011 • Prophets of Science FictionPeople

Arthur C Clarke

Some sci-fi storytellers are content to merely predict, but Sir Arthur C. Clarke creates. The writer is single-handedly responsible for the cornerstone of modern telecommunication technology: the satellite. Clarke's collaboration with director Stanley Kubrick on the iconic 2001 predicted videophones, iPads, and commercial spaceflight, while redefining science-fiction cinema for a new generation.

2011 • Prophets of Science FictionPeople

H G Wells

"I told you so..." H.G. Wells' self penned epitaph underscores a lifetime of grim yet uncanny prophecy. With stories like The Time Machine, The Invisible Man, The World Set Free, and The War of the Worlds, H.G. Wells established himself as a sci-fi writer of almost clairvoyant talent.

2011 • Prophets of Science FictionPeople

Philip K Dick

Literary genius, celebrated visionary, paranoid outcast: Writer Philip K. Dick lived a life of ever-shifting realities straight from the pages of his mind-bending sci-fi stories. His books have inspired films like Blade Runner, Total Recall, and Minority Report. His work confronts readers with a deceptively simple question: What is reality?

2011 • Prophets of Science FictionPeople

Mary Shelley

It’s alive! Mary Shelley set out to create a monster--along the way she created a masterpiece. In 1816, teenager Mary begins stitching together a patchwork of ancient legend, modern technology, and personal tragedy--giving life to her novel, Frankenstein...and the genre of science fiction.

2011 • Prophets of Science FictionPeople

Senna

Documentary about Brazilian Formula One champion Ayrton Senna, whose life was cut tragically short in 1994 in a fatal racing accident. The film draws on archive footage from his arrival on the Grand Prix scene in 1984, explores the rivalry between him and fellow F1 driver Alain Prost and follows the career of one of the sport's most charismatic figures through to his untimely death at the San Marino Grand Prix.

2010 • People

Deep Web

Deep Web gives the inside story of one of the the most important and riveting digital crime sagas of the century -- the arrest of Ross William Ulbricht, the convicted 30-year-old entrepreneur accused to be 'Dread Pirate Roberts,' creator and operator of online black market Silk Road. Being the only film with exclusive access to the Ulbricht family, Deep Web features the core architects of the Deep Web; anarchistic cryptographers who developed the Deep Web’s tools for the military in the early 1990s; the dissident journalists and whistleblowers who immediately sought refuge in this seemingly secure environment; and the figures behind the rise of Silk Road, which combined the security of the Deep Web with the anonymity of cryptocurrency.

2015 • People

14-Year-Old Prodigy Programmer Dreams In Code

Fourteen-year-old programmer and software developer Santiago Gonzalez might just be the next Steve Jobs. He already has 15 iOS apps to his name and dreams of designing for Apple. At age 12, Santiago became a full-time college student and is on track to earn his bachelor's degree in computer science and electrical engineering by age 16. By 17, when most teenagers are excited to just have their driver's license, Santiago will have his masters degree.

2013 • People

The Lost Tribes of Humanity

Alice Roberts explores the latest discoveries in the study of human origins, revealing the transformation that has been brought about in this field by genetics. Traditional paleo-anthropology, based on fossils, is being transformed by advanced genome sequencing techniques. We now know that there were at least four other distinct species of human on the planet at the same time as us - some of them identified from astonishingly well-preserved DNA extracted from 50,000-year-old bones, others hinted at by archaic sections of DNA hidden in our modern genome. What's more, we now know that our ancestors met and interacted with these other humans, in ways that still have ramifications today. Alice uses these revelations to update our picture of the human family tree.

2016 • HorizonPeople

Great Human Odyssey

Our ancient human ancestors once lived only in Africa, in tiny bands of a few thousand hunter-gatherers. Then we moved out of our African cradle, spreading rapidly to every corner of the planet. How did we acquire the skills, technology and talent to thrive in every environment on earth? How did our prehistoric forebears cross the Sahara on foot, survive frigid ice ages, and sail to remote Pacific islands? “Great Human Odyssey” is a spectacular global journey following their footsteps out of Africa along a trail of fresh scientific clues. With unique glimpses of today’s Kalahari hunters, Siberian reindeer herders, and Polynesian navigators, we discover amazing skills that hint at how our ancestors survived and prospered long ago.

2016 • NOVA PBSPeople

Planetary

We are in the midst of a global crisis of perspective. We have forgotten the undeniable truth that every living thing is connected. PLANETARY is a provocative and breathtaking wakeup call – a cross continental, cinematic journey, that explores our cosmic origins and our future as a species. It is a poetic and humbling reminder that now is the time to shift our perspective. PLANETARY asks us to rethink who we really are, to reconsider our relationship with ourselves, each other and the world around us – to remember that we are PLANETARY

2015 • People

The Mystery of Van Gogh's Ear

It is one of the greatest and bloodiest mysteries in art: what happened on the December night in 1888 when Vincent van Gogh took a blade to his own ear? Jeremy Paxman joins art sleuth Bernadette Murphy on her amazing quest to discover the truth - what exactly did the artist do, why did he do it and who was the unknown girl he is said to have handed his severed ear to, her real identity kept secret by her family for over a century? It is an event that defines van Gogh, who created his greatest masterpieces including the sunflowers at the same moment as suffering mental torture, but what are the real facts? This revealing detective story travels from Vincent's home in the south of France to the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, and uncovers key evidence hidden in a Californian library that has created an art-world sensation, as we finally solve the mystery of Van Gogh's ear.

2016 • People

Jade: Why I Chose Porn

22 year-old Jade graduated with a degree in Fashion from Manchester Metropolitan University in the summer of 2015. But rather than work in the world of fashion, Jade - aka Carly Rae Summers - has decided to pursue a career in porn. This film follows Jade as she embarks on her new full-time career, travelling to shoots in London, Barcelona and Prague, and explores the practical and ethical issues that surround a young female porn star in Britain today. Why would a well-educated young woman with a range of career options choose to pursue a career in porn?

2016 • People

The Rise and Fall of El Chapo

Killer, drug smuggler, folk hero, Houdini of jailhouse escapes--the legend of Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman is well known. But now this two-hour documentary special reveals an unprecedented look at the man behind the myth and how his international drug cartel impacts us right here at home.

2016 • People

Inside North Korea

In May 2016, BBC reporter Rupert Wingfield-Hayes was expelled from North Korea for showing disrespect and 'distorting facts'. He now tells the full story of his visit to the country and explores what his detention and interrogation by senior Korean officials say about this secretive state. He investigates the apparent upturn in the North Korean economy and asks if the signs of improvement in the capital Pyongyang are real. He also examines whether the people there are genuinely loyal to their young leader or whether Kim Jong Un is ruling by reign of terror.

2016 • People

The Meaning of Life

Why does an atheist bother to get up in the morning? That's the question Richard Dawkins seeks to answer as he continues his exploration of the big questions of life in a world shaking off religious faith. In a journey that takes him from the casinos of Las Vegas to Buddhist monasteries in the foothills of the Himalayas, Dawkins examines how both religious and non-religious people struggle to find meaning in their lives. He looks at how our existence is ruled by chance, meeting people whose fate was to be born into extreme poverty in India's slums and the survivors of a natural disaster in Joplin, Missouri, which was ripped apart in 2011 by a tornado on a random course.

2012 • Dawkins: Sex Death and the Meaning of LifePeople

Life after Death

Richard Dawkins tackles death. He investigates what, in place of religion, science can tell us about death.

2012 • Dawkins: Sex Death and the Meaning of LifePeople

Sin

In a journey that takes him through visually stunning locations across the world, Richard Dawkins builds a powerful argument for facing up to the scientific truth about life and death - however hard that might be.

2012 • Dawkins: Sex Death and the Meaning of LifePeople

Freud

Bettany Hughes travels to Vienna on the trail of Sigmund Freud, the father of psychoanalysis. Freud's influence surrounds us. In our vocabulary - repression, penis envy, the Freudian slip - and in the freedom we take for granted, to talk openly about our deepest feelings and insecurities. A pioneer in the study of the human mind, Freud's psychoanalytic methods addressed emotional issues, seldom even discussed in the 19th century. Talking to his patients inspired his radical understanding of the unconscious mind, as a repository of hidden repressed emotions and irrational primal desires.

2016 • Genius of the Modern WorldPeople

Nietzsche

The philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche was one of the most brilliant and dangerous minds of the 19th century. His uncompromising and often brutal ideas smashed the comfortable presuppositions and assumptions of religion, morality and science. His was a world not just bereft of God but almost of humanity, breathtaking in both its post-religious starkness and its originality. Bettany Hughes goes in search of the beliefs of a man whose work is amongst the most devastatingly manipulated and misinterpreted in philosophical history. Nietzsche's dislike of systems and of seeking truths left his ideas ambiguous and sometimes incoherent. It was this that made him vulnerable to interpretation, and as a result his thoughts - which warned against the very notion of a political system like totalitarianism - were manipulated to strengthen its ideals. Vocally opposed to anti-Semitism, his anti-Semitic sister made sure he became the poster boy for Hitler's drive for an Aryan ideal.

2016 • Genius of the Modern WorldPeople

Marx

Bettany Hughes investigates the revolutionary ideas of Karl Marx. Born to an affluent Prussian family, Marx became an angry, idealistic radical, constantly on the run for his political agitating and incendiary writing. In Paris he first formulated his explosive analysis of capitalism and its corrosive effects on human nature. In Brussels he co-authored the Communist Manifesto with Frederick Engels. In London his obsessive theorizing dragged his family into poverty and tragedy. Marx's masterpiece Das Capital was largely overlooked in his lifetime, and only 11 people attended his funeral. Yet his ideas would generate one of the most influential, and divisive, ideologies in history. Drawing on expert opinion and new evidence, Bettany reveals the flesh-and-blood man and his groundbreaking ideas.

2016 • Genius of the Modern WorldPeople

Journey's End

Early humans eventually colonized Australia, the South Pacific, and the Americas. But how did our ancestors master the oceans? Learn how new discoveries in ancient DNA research are changing our understanding of the earliest sea voyages, from Easter Island to the Bering Strait.

2015 • The Great Human OdysseyPeople

The Adaptable Ape

How did we become our planet's only global species, at home in every environment on Earth. Learn how our ancestors found a way through the deserts and out of Africa. Explore the meeting of Neanderthals and humans. And discover how we survived the Ice Age.

2015 • The Great Human OdysseyPeople

Rise of a Species

Like other kinds of human who once shared our world, homo sapiens should have died away. Discover how our species faced near extinction in Africa, and then found a place to rebuild. Explore the birth of language and art at archeological excavations scientists are now calling "the cradle of the human mind".

2015 • The Great Human OdysseyPeople

God Grew Tired of Us

Four boys from Sudan embark on a journey to America after years of wandering Sub-Saharan Africa in search of safety.

2006 • People

Da Vinci: Unlocking the Genius

Leonardo Da Vinci - the ultimate Renaissance man. In this special, meet some modern-day Leonardos who embody the inventive spirit of the master himself, and those who are working to bring his forgotten visions to life. Hosted by Kevin Brauch (Thirsty Traveller), this one-hour special travels to Chicago, Calgary, Italy and the U.K. to meet these modern Leonardos and discover how they are leaving their mark on the world and, in the spirit of da Vinci, are breaking the barriers of art and science today. Filmed in HD and featuring dramatic CGI, detailed 3D models and super macro photography, see how these modern-day inventors and their creations are continuing the legacy of Leonardo.

2006 • People

He Named Me Malala

He Named Me Malala is an intimate portrait of Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Malala Yousafzai, who was targeted by the Taliban and severely wounded by a gunshot when returning home on her school bus in Pakistan’s Swat Valley. The then 15-year-old (she turns 18 this July) was singled out, along with her father, for advocating for girls’ education, and the attack on her sparked an outcry from supporters around the world. She miraculously survived and is now a leading campaigner for girls’ education globally as co-founder of the Malala Fund. Acclaimed documentary filmmaker Davis Guggenheim (An Inconvenient Truth, Waiting for Superman) shows us how Malala, her father Zia and her family are committed to fighting for education for all girls worldwide. The film gives us an inside glimpse into this extraordinary young girl’s life – from her close relationship with her father who inspired her love for education, to her impassioned speeches at the UN, to her everyday life with her parents and brothers. - “One child, one teacher, one book and one pen can change the world." – Malala

2015 • People

Part 2

This series goes in pursuit of people with extraordinary skills that go beyond what is ordinarily deemed humanly possible. It sets out to put their unique talents under the spotlight and test their abilities scientifically to gain an understanding of what makes them so special and how it is possible for them to perform their incredible feats. Theirs are unbelievable stories of discovering their unique abilities and trying to get by in a world marked by the ordinary. Stunning 3D animations, parallels with the natural world, modern science, and personal anecdotes paint a gripping picture of these extraordinary people and their jaw-dropping talents.

2015 • The Human LimitsPeople

Part 1

The focus is set on individuals going beyond their physical boundaries. There’s freediving world record holder Herbert Nitsch who can hold his breath for more than nine minutes, “ice man” Wim Hof who likes going for a walk in the Arctic preferably without clothes, human echolocation expert Daniel Kish who can ride a bicycle despite his blindness and Bavarian ice climbing champion Ines Papers and mathematical super brains Gert Mittring and Rudiger Gramm who can solve nearly every arithmetic problem without a pocket calculator. How do they all manage to control their bodies? „Human limits“has the answer

2015 • The Human LimitsPeople

Finding Vivian Maier

Who is Vivian Maier? Now considered one of the 20th century's greatest street photographers, Vivian Maier was a mysterious nanny who secretly took over 100,000 photographs that went unseen during her lifetime. Since buying her work by chance at auction, amateur historian John Maloof has crusaded to put this prolific photographer in the history books. Maier's strange and riveting life and art are revealed through never-before-seen photographs, films, and interviews with dozens who thought they knew her.

2013 • People

The Man Who Cracked the Nazi Code

This is the incredible story of Alan Turing, a genius British mathematician and yet socially awkward man who cracked the encoded communications of the Nazis, thus making it possible D-Day landings! THE MAN WHO CRACKED THE NAZI CODE gives a fresh look at a whole section of the history of the Second World War and discovery that a close link exists between the Allied victory and the invention of the computer resulting in cracking the encoded communications of the Germans thus changing the course of history.

2014 • People

Political Theory - Karl Marx

Karl Marx remains deeply important today not as the man who told us what to replace capitalism with, but as someone who brilliantly pointed out what was inhuman and alienating about it.

2014 • The School of LifePeople

Philosophy - Plato

Plato was one of the world's earliest and possibly greatest philosophers. He matters because of his devotion to making humanity more fulfilled.

2014 • The School of LifePeople

Meet John Romero: One of the Godfathers of the First-Person Shooter

Motherboard meets John Romero, one of the creators behind Wolfenstein 3D, DOOM, and Quake, breakthrough games that all but created the first-person shooter genre.

2015 • People

Steve Jobs: One Last Thing

A look at the life and career of the technology business innovator and entrepreneur.

2011 • People

Island Stories

From the gold-diggers on Buru in Indonesia, to the Rastafarians in the Colombian islet of Providencia, Island Stories travels to six islands to meet the people who call them home.

2015 • People

An Honest Liar

The life and career of the renowned stage magician turned scientific skeptic of the paranormal, James Randi.

2014 • People

Humans in 1000 Years

What will humanity look like in 1000 years? Watch as we cover some cutting-edge innovations happening today. Thanks to the National Geographic Channel for sponsoring this video!

2015 • AsapSCIENCEPeople

Citizenfour

A documentarian and a reporter travel to Hong Kong for the first of many meetings with Edward Snowden.

2014 • People

Richard Dawkins: Militant atheism

Richard Dawkins urges all atheists to openly state their position — and to fight the incursion of the church into politics and science. A fiery, funny, powerful talk.

2002 • TEDPeople

Part 3

Work

2015 • HumanPeople

Part 2

Life and Death

2015 • HumanPeople

Part 1

Love

2015 • HumanPeople

How False News Can Spread

In previous decades, most news with global reach came from several major newspapers and networks with the resources to gather information directly. The speed with which information spreads now, however, has created the ideal conditions for something called circular reporting. Noah Tavlin sheds light on this phenomenon.

2015 • TED-EdPeople

The Fantastic Mr Feynman

"Richard Feynman is one of the most iconic, influential and inspiring scientists of the 20th century. He helped design the atomic bomb, solved the mystery of the Challenger Shuttle catastrophe and won a Nobel Prize. Now, 25 years after his death - in his own words and those of his friends and family - this is the story of the most captivating communicator in the history of science"

2013 • People

Mongolia

In her final journey of the series, Kate Humble travels deep into the southern Gobi Desert in Mongolia to live with an extended family of cashmere goat and yak herders. Here in the seemingly barren wastes of Asia's largest desert, nomads have lived cheek by jowl with nature for centuries. Chimid, the 78-year-old mother of ten, welcomes Kate into her large family. With their herds of goats, sheep, horses and yaks, this family are successful nomads. They move four times a year with the seasons across the Gobi, to sheltered winter pastures and mountaintop summer grazing.

2015 • Kate Humble: Living with Nomads People

Siberia

Kate Humble journeys to the far north of Siberia in the teeth of the Arctic winter to travel with the Nenets. These reindeer herders spend their lives migrating with the seasons up and down the Yamal Peninsula, following their herds from pasture to pasture. But it's a tough and precarious existence, living in temperatures that can drop to -54C. And the extremes soon take a toll on Kate - a lover of warm weather - and her crew, when on the way to meet their Nenets family their vehicle breaks down and they're forced to abandon their plans.

2015 • Kate Humble: Living with Nomads People

Nepal

In this first episode, Kate travels to south west Nepal in search of the country's last community of nomads, the Raute people. Almost all of the Raute population has already settled in Nepal and India - just one group of 140 people remain living as nomads. These hunter-gatherers still move camp every few weeks through the steeply wooded hills and mountains in one of the poorest countries on the planet. Life for this last Raute group is increasingly tough, as they face pressure to settle from Nepal's government and hostility from the farmers on whose land they camp.

2015 • Kate Humble: Living with Nomads People

Why Humans Run the World

70,000 years ago humans were insignificant animals. The most important thing to know about prehistoric humans is that they were unimportant. Their impact on the world was very small, less than that of jellyfish, woodpeckers or bumblebees.

TEDPeople

Why Do We Lie?

Do you sometimes tell a lie? Why? Is it human nature to lie?

Through the WormholePeople

Twin Sisters: A World Apart

This is the poignant true story of twin sisters from China, found as babies in a cardboard box in 2003 and adopted by two separate sets of parents - one from California, the other from a remote fishing village in Norway. Neither of the adoptive parents were told their daughters were twins, but a chance sighting at the orphanage enabled them to keep in touch, until a DNA test proved their hunch had been right.

People

Plato’s Allegory of the Cave

Twenty four hundred years ago, Plato, one of history’s most famous thinkers, said life is like being chained up in a cave forced to watch shadows flitting across a stone wall. Beyond sounding quite morbid, what exactly did he mean? Alex Gendler unravels Plato's Allegory of the Cave, found in Book VII of "The Republic."

People

Japan's Disposable Workers: Net Cafe Refugees

Internet cafes have existed in Japan for over a decade, but in the mid 2000’s, customers began using these spaces as living quarters. Internet cafe refugees are mostly temporary employees; their salary too low to rent their own apartments.

People

The Lie We Live

Exposing the truth about our corrupt world. My name is Spencer Cathcart and this is a short documentary film I made & wrote. In the video I question our freedom, the education system, corporations, money, the American capitalist system, the US government, world collapse, the environment, climate change, genetically modified food, and our treatment of animals.

People

The End of God?

As the Pope ends his visit to Britain, historian Dr Thomas Dixon delves into the BBC's archive to explore the troubled relationship between religion and science. From the creationists of America to the physicists of the Large Hadron Collider, he traces the expansion of scientific knowledge and asks whether there is still room for God in the modern world.

HorizonPeople

Sex Party Secrets

This frank documentary enters the hidden world of the UK's 'sexual elite', meeting the meticulously vetted guests fulfilling their fantasies at exclusive sex parties.

People

The Five Major World Religions

It's perfectly human to grapple with questions, like 'Where do we come from?' and 'How do I live a life of meaning?' These existential questions are central to the five major world religions -- and that's not all that connects these faiths. John Bellaimey explains the intertwined histories and cultures of Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity and Islam.

TED-EdPeople

Tom Wheeler

Peaks of Life is a short Documentary about UK rider and downhill racer Tom Wheeler. The documentary illustrates Tom's lengthy recovery and rehabilitation process after loosing the use of his right arm whilst racing in Rheola, Wales back in 2011. Despite paralysing his right arm, Tom's determination and dedication means he's able to do the things he loves most including riding his mountain bike again. A touching story that some may consider a tragedy at first, but with such a great out look of life Tom isn't letting his paralysed arm slow him down.

People

Moving Forward

The Zeitgeist Film Series is about examining the world we share, the values we hold, the problems we face, along with what we can do to make it better.

ZeitgeistPeople

Addendum

The Zeitgeist Film Series is about examining the world we share, the values we hold, the problems we face, along with what we can do to make it better.

ZeitgeistPeople

The Movie

The Zeitgeist Film Series is about examining the world we share, the values we hold, the problems we face, along with what we can do to make it better.

ZeitgeistPeople

Are You Good or Evil?

What makes us good or evil? It's a simple but deeply unsettling question. One that scientists are now starting to answer. Horizon meets the researchers who have studied some of the most terrifying people behind bars - psychopathic killers. But there was a shock in store for one of these scientists, Professor Jim Fallon, when he discovered that he had the profile of a psychopath. And the reason he didn't turn out to be a killer holds important lessons for all of us. We meet the scientist who believes he has found the moral molecule and the man who is using this new understanding to rewrite our ideas of crime and punishment.

People

Population pyramids: Powerful predictors of the future

Population statistics are like crystal balls -- when examined closely, they can help predict a country's future (and give important clues about the past). Kim Preshoff explains how using a visual tool called a population pyramid helps policymakers and social scientists make sense of the statistics, using three different countries' pyramids as examples.

TED-EdPeople

Secrets of Body Language

Body language is a form of non-verbal communication, which consists of body posture, gestures, facial expressions, and eye movements. Humans send and interpret such signals almost entirely subconsciously.

People

Does My Voice Really Sound Like That?

It’s weird to hear how your voice really sounds. But why does it sound different to you?

People

What Matters Most in Life?

What is the most important thing in life? Money? Happiness? Love? Those things are certainly important, but what matters most is...

People

This Will Revolutionize Education

Many technologies have promised to revolutionize education, but so far none has. With that in mind, what could revolutionize education?

People

Einstein

James May reveals a world of facts about Albert Einstein and his groundbreaking theories.

2012 • James May's Things You Need to KnowPeople

The language of lying

We hear anywhere from 10 to 200 lies a day. And although we’ve spent much of our history coming up with ways to detect these lies by tracking physiological changes in their tellers, these methods have proved unreliable. Is there a more direct approach?

TED-EdPeople

The Brain Creates Religion

Believing in God generates soothing "juices" in the brain that make us feel good.

People

Apeman - Spaceman

Beginning in Ethiopia, Professor Brian Cox discovers how the universe played a key role in our ascent from apeman to spaceman by driving the expansion of our brains. But big brains alone did not get us to space.

2014 • Human UniversePeople

No Internet Week

Addicts disconnected from the "noise". The internet has taken over our lives and permeates every moment.

People

Richard

Richard is the fascinating story of a travelling piano tuner who chooses to live outdoors. Shot in London, the film takes an alternative look at someone who treats the entire city as a home.

People

How to understand power

Every day, we move and operate within systems of power that other people have constructed. But we’re often uncomfortable talking about power. Why? Eric Liu describes the six sources of power and explains how understanding them is key to being an effective citizen.

TED-EdPeople

The Secret You

Professor Marcus du Sautoy goes in search of answers to one of science's greatest mysteries: how do we know who we are? While the thoughts that make us feel as though we know ourselves are easy to experience, they are notoriously difficult to explain. So, in order to find out where they come from, Marcus subjects himself to a series of probing experiments.

People

Don't Panic - The Truth About Population

Using state-of-the-art 3D graphics and the timing of a stand-up comedian, world-famous statistician Professor Hans Rosling presents a spectacular portrait of our rapidly changing world.

People

Existential Bummer

Perhaps the greatest existential bummer of all is Entropy

People

Is Evil Rational?

Is evil rational? If it is, then how can we depend on reason alone to make a better world? Best-selling author Dennis Prager has a challenging answer.

2013 • People

The Science of Overpopulation

Hank Green talks about the issues of rising global population.

2012 • People

The Innovation of Loneliness

What is the connection between Social Networks and Being Lonely? Quoting the words of Sherry Turkle from her TED talk - Connected, But Alone.

2013 • People

The Greatest Speech Ever Made

Charlie Chaplin's final speech in the film the great dictator, with a splash of modern imagery.

2011 • People