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Bones • episode "1/3" Origins of Us

Category: Nature
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In the first episode, Dr Alice Roberts looks at how our skeleton reveals our incredible evolutionary journey.

Origins of Us • 3 episodes •

Bones

In the first episode, Dr Alice Roberts looks at how our skeleton reveals our incredible evolutionary journey.

Nature

Guts

In this second episode Dr Alice Roberts charts how our ancestors’ hunt for food has driven the way we look and behave today – from the shape of our face, to the way we see and even the way we attract the opposite sex.

Nature

Brains

In the final episode Dr Alice Roberts explores how our species, homo sapiens, developed our large brain; and asks why we are the only one of our kind left on the planet today?

Brain

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