Evolution • 2012 • episode "S2E3" James May's Things You Need to Know

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James May treks into the wilderness to learn about Darwin's theory of natural selection.

James May's Things You Need to Know • 2011 - 2012 • 7 episodes •

Einstein

James May reveals a world of facts about Albert Einstein and his groundbreaking theories.

2012 • People

The Universe

James May takes a journey of discovery across the universe.

2011 • Astronomy

The Weather

James May asks the big questions about the weather, including what is a cloud?

2011 • Environment

The Brain

James May cranks open your cranium to reveal what's really taking place inside your head.

2012 • Brain

Evolution

James May treks into the wilderness to learn about Darwin's theory of natural selection.

2012 • Nature

Speed

James May rapidly and easily explains all you need to know about speed.

2012 • Physics

Engineering

James May gives a nuts and bolts explanation of the fascinating science of engineering.

2012 • Nature

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Part 2

The museum's dinosaur experts Susie Maidment and Paul Barrett follow up an exciting tip-off about some possible dino footprints in Wales. Meanwhile, the world's most famous dinosaur - Dippy the Diplodocus - is on a road trip around the country and needs an up-close inspection to make sure it's safe.

S1E2Natural History Museum: World of Wonder • 2020 • Nature

Land of Rivers

In the final episode of "Hidden India, the Ganges is central. This mighty river flows through the heart of the nation, from deep in the Himalayas to the widespread delta mangrove forests and behind the wide blue ocean. She carries valuable nutrients, and irrigates the fertile soil of Asia. Moreover, there is in the wilder parts - far beyond the cities - to discover many hidden nature. Hidden beaches are a haven for tens of thousands of young turtles in mysterious swamps houses playful mudskippers and otter families enjoy themselves in the flowing water.

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Attenborough's Wonder of Eggs

David Attenborough has a passion for birds' eggs. These remarkable structures nurture new life, protecting it from the outside world at the same time as allowing it to breathe. They are strong enough to withstand the full weight of an incubating parent and weak enough to allow a chick to break free. But how is an egg made? Why are they the shape they are? And perhaps most importantly, why lay an egg at all? Piece by piece, from creation to hatching, David reveals the wonder behind these miracles of nature.

Natural World • 2018 • Nature

Photosynthesis

The air we breathe, and all the food we eat, is created from water, sunlight, carbon dioxide and a few minerals. It sounds simple, but this process is one of the most fascinating and complicated in all of science, and without it there could be no life on earth. For centuries people believed that plants grew by eating soil. In the 17th century, pioneer botanists began to make the connection between the growth of a plant and the energy from the sun. They discovered how plants use water, sunlight and carbon dioxide to produce sugars - how, in fact, a plant grows. The process of photosynthesis is still at the heart of scientific research today, with universities across the world working hard to replicate in the lab what plants do with ruthless efficiency. Their goal is to produce a clean, limitless fuel and if they get it right it will change all our lives.

2/3Botany: A Blooming History • 2011 • Nature

Land Invaders

David Attenborough reveals the bizarre adaptations which have helped amphibians break their ties with water as he meets marsupial frogs, show-off newts and giant salamanders.

S1E2Life in Cold Blood • 2008 • Nature

Designed for a Welsh Life

In this final episode, Iolo explores bird design - from their ability to fly to the way that their beak design, colour and camouflage enable them to live in the many habitats Wales has to offer. Using ultra-slow motion photography, Iolo looks at how garden birds have such control over take off and landing, and explains why fulmars are one of our most supreme fliers.

5/5Secret Life of Birds • 2012 • Nature