Expedition Wallacea • 2007

Category: Nature | Torrent: | Subtitle:

Marine biologist Matthias Kopfmiller wants to know whether the Wallace Line exists underwater. We descend deep into a subterranean crevice and shine a light on a universe that has never before been captured on film.

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