A Leopard's Last Stand • 2015 • episode "S1E2" Africa's Hunters

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Kamuti the leopard has reigned supreme over her corner of the Luangwa Valley for 10 years. She's defended her territory, hunted antelope for food, and even kept the nearby pride of lions at bay. But a younger leopard is determined to replace her. Can she survive one more challenge, or will this be her last stand?

Africa's Hunters • 2015 - 2018 • 11 episodes •

The Hungry Leopard

At 13, Kamuti is one of the oldest leopards in the Luangwa region of Zambia. Old age brings many challenges, from hunting antelope to keeping a watchful eye on the lion pride nearby. Using a military-grade thermal camera, we lift the veil on the secret world of this enigmatic nocturnal predator for the first time.

2015 • Nature

A Leopard's Last Stand

Kamuti the leopard has reigned supreme over her corner of the Luangwa Valley for 10 years. She's defended her territory, hunted antelope for food, and even kept the nearby pride of lions at bay. But a younger leopard is determined to replace her. Can she survive one more challenge, or will this be her last stand?

2015 • Nature

Bound by Blood

At the height of the Zambian dry season, three lionesses in the Nsefu pride are pregnant. Even with protection from fellow lions, the stakes couldn't be higher, from cub-hungry predators like leopards and hyenas to the hunting duties necessary to sustain the group. Can the pride meet the demands of their growing population?

2015 • Nature

The Misfit

A six-week-old lion cub gets separated from his pride and has to face the nighttime terrors of the African bush. Cub-hungry predators, dehydration, and rival lions instinctively primed to kill are just some of the threats ahead. Can this intrepid little misfit find his way back to safety, or will the harsh rules of the wild prevail?

2015 • Nature

Teenage Pride

The Nsefu lion pride of Zambia are in an enviable position, with a litter of new cubs, control of the best territory on the Luangwa River, and strong males to protect them. But as the cubs grow older, pressure mounts as they begin to understand their roles and how every misstep can threaten the very existence of their family.

2015 • Nature

Survivors of the Plains

In hyena society, the females call the shots--but they're also charged with making difficult decisions. So when drought pushes a spotted hyena clan to the brink of starvation, the matriarch has a call to make: wait in the Liuwa Plains for rain that will bring wildebeest, or set out in search of a nourishing kill?

2015 • Nature

The Trials of Olimba

Our epic journey through Zambia's Luangwa Valley continues with a new young leopard queen named Olimba taking over the wily Kamuti,s turf. Unlike her predecessor, Olimba has yet to acquire all the tricks of the trade, from hunting antelope to evading lions, hyenas, and even wild dogs. But the biggest threat to Olimba comes from yet another female leopard invading her space. Can she protect what is rightfully hers?

2018 • Nature

Brothers in Arms

It's time to check up on the Nsefu lion pride as they welcome seven new cubs into the fold, but can these new arrivals survive the hardships ahead? One of the cubs, nicknamed The Dreamer, strikes up a friendship with the awkward, now-adolescent Misfit. Together, they forge a special bond that bodes well for their future. Do these two unlikely friends have what it takes to survive?

2018 • Nature

Kings of Nsefu

Twin lions Chief and Notch maintain a powerful bond, both to each other and to the famous Nsefu pride over which they preside. Enter a pair of nomadic rivals, flagrantly trespassing on pride land. Will the old allegiances hold or will the pride females be swayed by the lure of these bold interlopers? It falls on the brothers to demonstrate that they are the true kings of Nsefu.

2018 • Nature

The Hot Springs Pack

The wild dogs of Luangwa Valley are organized, tenacious and strictly hierarchical under the leadership of an alpha pair. While cheetahs sprint and lions ambush, wild dogs rely on their stamina to wear prey out, sometimes running up to 20 miles at a time. But to maintain dominance, they'll need to train their youngest members to hunt effectively as part of the pack-and time is running out.

2018 • Nature

Heir to the Clan

For spotted hyenas, Luangwa Valley is full of threats, including predatory lions, furtive leopards, and even resentful relatives. Meet Spotty, the youngest daughter of an alpha female hyena. She's the heir apparent to the powerful Chimbwe clan, but she'll need to assert herself if she's to assume her rightful place as matriarch-in-waiting. Will she survive to adulthood and take on the throne?

2018 • Nature

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