In the Beginning • 2013 • episode "1/3" Archaeology: A Secret History

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He begins by going back 2,000 years to explore how archaeology began by trying to prove a biblical truth - a quest that soon got archaeologists into dangerous water.

Archaeology: A Secret History • 0 • 3 episodes •

In the Beginning

He begins by going back 2,000 years to explore how archaeology began by trying to prove a biblical truth - a quest that soon got archaeologists into dangerous water.

2013 • History

The Search for Civilisation

He shows how discoveries in the 18th and 19th centuries overturned ideas of when and where civilisation began, as empires competed to literally 'own' the past.

2013 • History

The Power of the Past

He shows how 20th-century attention turned from civilisation and kings to the search for the common man against a background of science and competing political ideologies.

2013 • History

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