Let There Be Life • episode "2/2" The Secrets of Quantum Physics

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Physicist Jim Al-Khalili routinely deals with the strangest subject in all of science - quantum physics, the astonishing and perplexing theory of sub-atomic particles. But now he's turning his attention to the world of nature. Can quantum mechanics explain the greatest mysteries in biology?

The Secrets of Quantum Physics • 0 • 2 episodes •

Einstein's Nightmare

How Albert Einstein thought he'd found the fatal flaw in quantum theory because it implies that sub-atomic particles can communicate faster than light.

Physics

Let There Be Life

Physicist Jim Al-Khalili routinely deals with the strangest subject in all of science - quantum physics, the astonishing and perplexing theory of sub-atomic particles. But now he's turning his attention to the world of nature. Can quantum mechanics explain the greatest mysteries in biology?

Physics

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