Mars InSight: Seven Minutes to Touchdown • 2018

Category: Astronomy
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The fate of the Mars InSight lander will all come down to a fiery seven-minute freefall into the Red Planet. Will it survive and reveal new insight into our planetary neighbour, or will the atmosphere of Mars prove to be too much for our new planetary explorer?

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